Big decision: engine broke- many options, one decision

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Apr 14, 2016
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It sounds like your new place is more rural? (Hunting dogs)

1) buy a good used engine from one of the reputable sellers here.
2) pull the head to inspect the bores. If no additional work is required, great, you now have a healthy 1FZ-FE with a fresh head gasket and valve stem seals.
3) drive the 80 to the new place and leave it there.
4) buy something much more fuel efficient and comfortable for long trips. Rav4, Highlander, F-150 electric, luxury German car, whatever.

If I were planning multiple 2,800 mile round road trips per year, I would *not* choose to do that in an 80. Keep the 80 for fun and satisfaction. Drive something disposable into the ground instead.
 

Outsane

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I don't need my temp gauge to be accurate, I want it to be precise.

So I can know that cruising down the highway temps are near 185... and if I push up a grade with the ac on it rises to 200, or 15 degrees warmer.

There is also no magical number where it's too hot a d the hg is going to blow..

Also I prefer the ultragauge over the scangauge2 because it will make noise and beep at me. Usually happens when I go above 4150 rpms.
 
Joined
Apr 9, 2011
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Cardiff-by-the-Sea, CA
Yep. AC cutoff is 226*. In my book, that is overheating
Well, actually 226 F is not overheating, unless you are running a open, non-sealed coolant system.
Most of us run 15 psi Radiator Caps. At 15 psi water boils at 249.7 F (lookup ASME Steam Tables).
that’s the great thing about water, it’s boiling point increases as pressure increases. A Pressurized Water Reactor nuclear core operates at around 600 F exit temperature, yet the water is not boiling and is efficentry removing heat. That’s because the reactor operates at 2250 psi, and water does not boil until it gets to a whopping 653 F.

A word on overheating: Water remains an efficient remover of heat from the block and cylinder walls up to the point of boiling, in our case, at 249 F. At temperatures before 249 F nucleate boiling (tiny bubbles) is occurring, and that is a really good heat transfer mechanism. However, once 249 F is reached, bulk boiling occurs, and the resulting sheets of steam blanket the block internal surfaces, thus insulating these surfaces from heat transfer. Steam is actually a poor conductor of heat, compared to liquid water. The result of bulk boiling is a fairly fast transition from engine temperature OK, to engine overheating.

Thankfully, our engines run significantly below 249 F with plenty of margin.
 

clx16

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Most of us run 15 psi Radiator Caps. At 15 psi water boils at 249.7 F
Makes keeping the coolant hoses/cap in good shape to handle both the temperature and pressure as well as vibration so that it doesn't loose the ability to keep 15psi. I still like to keep mine between 185 and 204f. It's a norm for my setup so past that i have an issue that can get out of hand quicky.

I do think overheating can be measured in more than the coolant being able to still cool, as the gaskets and various metals move and flex to different rates based on temperature so you can overheat something that is still being cooled by a non boiling water. It just might not be too hot for the boiling point of water but be too hot for my gaskets or lubrication becomes too thin to provide good pressure etc.
 
Joined
Aug 5, 2010
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5,607
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Colorado
Well, actually 226 F is not overheating, unless you are running a open, non-sealed coolant system.
Most of us run 15 psi Radiator Caps. At 15 psi water boils at 249.7 F (lookup ASME Steam Tables).
that’s the great thing about water, it’s boiling point increases as pressure increases. A Pressurized Water Reactor nuclear core operates at around 600 F exit temperature, yet the water is not boiling and is efficentry removing heat. That’s because the reactor operates at 2250 psi, and water does not boil until it gets to a whopping 653 F.

A word on overheating: Water remains an efficient remover of heat from the block and cylinder walls up to the point of boiling, in our case, at 249 F. At temperatures before 249 F nucleate boiling (tiny bubbles) is occurring, and that is a really good heat transfer mechanism. However, once 249 F is reached, bulk boiling occurs, and the resulting sheets of steam blanket the block internal surfaces, thus insulating these surfaces from heat transfer. Steam is actually a poor conductor of heat, compared to liquid water. The result of bulk boiling is a fairly fast transition from engine temperature OK, to engine overheating.

Thankfully, our engines run significantly below 249 F with plenty of margin.
I get what you're saying, and to each his own in terms of what is an acceptable temp to run. I personally would not be comfortable with running temps consistently over 215 and certainly not 225. Just because the cooling system is still doing *something* doesn't mean the truck isn't too hot. My point was more to the fact that the factory gauge has a huge dead spot and is not helpful at all if you want to know what's going on with your coolant temps.

Sorry for the thread derail. And @gummycarbs may have the winning recipe for your particular situation 👍
 

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