Baseline, Repair, & PM Task Estimates

Joined
Aug 26, 2005
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Atlanta
Hi all,

I recently bought a 94 Cruiser and am trying to get all my baselining activities sorted out... I've read through a lot of posts, and have a huge list of things that need to be done, but i'm not sure what i should take on myself and what I should take to get done at a shop. Time and money are the obvious constraints, and i don't have a lot of either unfortunately. So...I think it'd be great to have a resource that categorizes all typical cruiser repairs, baselining activities, and PM tasks by:

1) est. cost to DIY (parts/tools),
2) est. cost to get done professionally,
3) time required to DIY,
4) level of technical proficiency with a wrench (i'm thinking like a 1 - 5 scale here)

Does such a thing exist? It may be ambitious/presumptuous for a newbie to suggest, but I'd think something like this would be a great FAQ resource, and I'd be glad to help compile data ;)

Thoughts?

Thanks!
Mike
 

Biff

 
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There is no central location for all that info, but if you search long enough you can compile enough threads to organize the data into an faq. For example search under "Birf Job" and you'll find a million threads due to the fact that its the most common and expensive P.M. depending if you do it or have someone do it for you. I would say go for it we always need another FAQ.
 
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Any thoughts on how else to quantify/categorize tasks? do the four points of measure i listed seem reasonable/sufficient?
 

Biff

 
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poomasta said:
Any thoughts on how else to quantify/categorize tasks? do the four points of measure i listed seem reasonable/sufficient?
You pretty much covered most of the questions a newbie would ask, now get to work on that FAQ. :D
 

Onur

Retired LC Parts Professional
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I like these questions.

We might want to add if we have had personal experience with certain mechanics/shops etc. and the job they did on these PM/baselining activities.

The 60's section has a nice sticky about mechanics/shops in different regions, and people give testimonial-like statements. I know we do this implicitly in individual threads when we give recommendations, but a consolidated source might be a great idea; the maze of search is sometimes daunting for new people.

This is a lot of work. I hope you are up for the task of cutting through what is fact and what is fiction...this, I think, is the most difficult part. For example, what might be 1 :banana: for some might be an entire day operation due to lack of experience/knowledge. When we give advice, I think this is something we should all try to do--explain the procedures and their difficulty as much as possible.

That way, prospective DIY'ers won't feel intimidated by something like, for example, the birf job or a rear axle rebuild. Sometimes a mythology grows around certain PM's and other DIY activities, when in fact their ease is masked by basically length of time and dirtiness of job.

At least, that's been my experience working on the rig.

I'd be happy to help in this endeavor if it gets off the ground. Drop a line--I like research :flipoff2:

Best.
-onur
 

Biff

 
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beno said:
Sometimes a mythology grows around certain PM's and other DIY activities, when in fact their ease is masked by basically length of time and dirtiness of job.

LOL!!! ya like the PHH- how many threads have popped up with how difficult it is.
 

GeoRoss

 
Joined
Dec 4, 2004
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Tucson AZ
I bought my '94 in May and I think (?) that I may almost-sorta-kinda-be done with getting most of the PM done:

1. First thing I did was base line the fluids:
Oil-dino
diffs/T-case mobile 1
Transmission
Rad. flushed
pesky heater hose
new thermostat
I have planned on three relatively quick oil changes (1000 miles) then will change to mobile 1. The belts and major hoses were relatively new and OEM, but I have an extra set ready to go in as soon as they are needed.

2. I then did a basic tune-up
PVC valve and grommet
new plugs
new wires
new rotor&cap

This was needed as I was getting arcing noise in the radio, plus it ran better. I was out of town most of the summer and didn't start back up until August.

My next job was new tires (BFG at 285/70) and did the wimpy spare tire lift.

3. I then put in the center diff lock switch, pin 7 and replaced some bulbs that were burnt out.

4. The throttle cable's outer sheath was looking skanky, so I replaced it. I also have a new air intake hose to replace the nearly petrified one. I haven't changed it out yet.

5. Found a leaky DS knuckle, so did a complete service replacing all the bearings while I was in there with the help of a local fellow mudder. I also put on new rotors. I tried out the 100 series pads, but did like them as I thought they were hanging up on the rotors.

6. With the new axile seals I found that my front diff breather was clogged, so I extended the front one.

Left to do:
7. Check the rear brake pads and rotors. I have new pads to slip in there if needed.
8. Rear axile service and extend rear diff breather.
9. Check the drive shafts and U-joints, disassemble and regrease
10. Rebuild front and back calipers, flush brake lines, extend brake lines?

I want to do 7-9, I may let sleeping dogs lie on 10 to at least the point when I do my lift.

The supspension is actually now becoming a PM issue (yee-ha) as I noticed that the rubber things (bushings?) that are where the shocks attach are crumbling. There is a grey goo also coming out of the rubber boot on the tie rod ends.

I am afraid to add up the receipts, but I know I have spent more than I had planned on. I also did almost all the work, except the initial fluid baseline, it had to get done before I left the country and I had no time. Even doing most of the work, it hasn't been cheep, I would guess I have easily spent $1000 dollars on parts, fluids, greases, tools and paper towells and another almost $900 on tires. I am now at the point where the lift/suspension work, aux fuel tank and spare battery (my most needed mods) have been put on hold while I catch my breath. After that is all done, then I'll look into bumpers and sliders.

Hope this helps get things started,

Ross

ps beno, how's the thesis writing coming :grinpimp:, don't make me come up there and staple your butt to a chair in front of your computer.
 
Joined
Nov 29, 2004
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Tempe, AZ
This is a great idea for a place to start for newbies that just buy a truck.
So lets get this compiled and posted in the FAQ's

I purchased my 96 with 63k miles 3 months ago. Since I have done the following PM

Moble 1 Oil/Oil Filter
Moble 1 in Diffs/Tcase
replaced ATF once (not true flush)
Flushed Syn Blue brake fluid
Changed Radiator with OEM brass
Changed fan clutch (Viscious Coupler)
Changed belts
Changed thermastate
Have new Rad hoses but haven't put them on
Then I Replaced most of the stock syspension with the Slee 6" kit
MTR tires 315/75-16
Removed OEM roof rack and fixed with Rhino lining



Still have axle rebuilds (but due to the low miles that will wait till for a while)
PHH
PCV
Battery (will be replaced with dual set up)


I am sure I am missing lots of stuff so I would also love to see the final list from the men that know!!
 
Joined
Aug 26, 2005
Messages
63
Location
Atlanta
This is all great guys, and is much of the same stuff on my to-do list, but when you list out all that you've done, could you provide estimates of the above four points. I'll start dredging through responses here and on other posts and compile some data.

to recap:
1) est. cost to DIY (parts/tools),
2) est. cost to get done professionally (if you got a quote or have an idea)
3) time required to DIY -- let's keep this estimate as an "ideal" time to complete (assuming you did everything right the first time and ran into no issues), point #4 below will allow for time inflation based on "gumbyness" :)
4) level of technical proficiency with a wrench (i'm thinking like a 1 - 5 scale here) - for this categorization, let's say 1 = complete novice new to auto repair, armed with an FSM, 3 = intermediate cruiser repair junkie, 5 = "the PHH and Birfs are child's play (maybe i could use some help with definitions here :confused: )
 
Joined
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Messages
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So, "oil change" for example might be categorized as

1) $20 (non-synth oil & oem filter)
2) $30
3) 1 hour
4) 1
 
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