Are all chevy 350 the same?

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Hi everyone,
My 65 40 already had a 350 in it when I purchased it a couple of years ago. I would like to replace the engine with a new one. The problem is that I don't know what year it came from. Would it be safe just to get any 350 in it for what ever year? The engine is NOT serpentine. It is attached to a stock 3spd LC tranny.
Last thing, any suggestions on where I can get a good Long Block?
I got quotes from Autozone & Kragen for around $1400 including core charge.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 
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They're not all the same. There should be a engine # on the left? back side of the engine, which should give you an original designation.

When my 350 blew I got a rebuilt engine from a reputable rebuilder for around $1000 (2002). Good luck!
 
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Easy search : http://www.nastyz28.com/sbchevy/sblock.html

Use the block casting numbers to identify yours and buy a replacement using the same numbers to make your changeout as easy as possible.

You'll find a plate adapter between your bellhousing and the 3 speed. Use it and the same bellhousing to retain the 3 speed. Different methods are used for other transmissions.
 
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I would stay away form the AutoZone / Kragen rebuilds. I my past experance, they are no good. A new crate motor from GM is the only way to go! They are not that much more, and you can get a 1 year warrenty. On the Kragen type motors, you get a 30 day warr.

Shawn
 
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Shawn Russell said:
I would stay away form the AutoZone / Kragen rebuilds. I my past experance, they are no good. A new crate motor from GM is the only way to go! They are not that much more, and you can get a 1 year warrenty. On the Kragen type motors, you get a 30 day warr.

Shawn

I'd agree with this. Years ago a good friend of mine was an automotive machinist for one of the big rebuilding factory type operations called "Automotive Engineering". I don't know if they're still in business, but at the time they supplied engines to most of the area (maybe the nation?) chain stores to be sold as house name rebuilds.

He bored every block to the biggest oversize and later ground every crank to the smallest journal diameter. There was a regular production line with people each doing seperate phases of the job. That was done on all rebuilds so that Automotive engineering could limit their inventory of bearings, pistons, rings, etc. to the sizes needed for the max. oversizes only for each engine type.

What that meant to the customer, unbeknownst to him, was that that nice 'new' rebuild he'd just had installed could never be rebuilt again and would not be accepted as a core either.

With a new engine this might be only a limited problem. But with Automotive Engineering engines it was pretty well understood that they built to their six month warranty and it was pretty amazing how their engines seemed to often develop piston pin knocks or broken camshafts at just over the warranty expiration.

I've never trusted any of the 'super advertized high dollar rebuild production houses since.
 

Gumby

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Bellhousing bolt patterns are the same. Motor mount bolt patterns are the same. Many shared the same bolt patterns on the front of the block and head.

Big changes were with TBI when the head to intake pattern changed as well as the valve cover bolts moving to the center and with the two piece crank seal going to a one peice with an external seal retainer.

If yours was origionally non-serp, then you probably have angled bolts on the intake and a one piece seal.

If the conversion was done early in it's life then the bolt patterns on the front of the heads might be different than a typical 70s block. If it was done in the 70s, then most any block from that era will fit with all of the accesories bolting up just fine

See www.mortec.com for info on where to find the block info and how to decode yours.
 
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Also keep in mind that the main crank journals can vary some are 4-bolt mains and some are 2-bolt mains.

Multi-port is very nice and can be very pricey. I would determine your needs and your budget first. Always buy the best heads you can afford. This is where most of your power will be either held up or released with cam, induction, etc.

IMO you can not go wrong with a 383. this is a 350 with a 400 crank.
It gives you more Hp and more importantly MORE TORQUE!!!

You can get almost any crate engine company to build you a crate 383.
It's your best bang for the buck. Period.

Chevy crate motors from GM are pricey. But most of the time you get what you pay for.

"Speeds just a question of money, How fast do you wan to go?"

-the Road Warrior
 

Mace

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Colorado Boy-74-FJ40 said:
TPI is not as susceptible to the effects of altitude. You get a better fuel delivery and better throttle response
Why is altitude not as big of a deal with TPI???

Performance gains are about 2 hp between the systems. With a simirly built motor there is almost no real gain from TBI to tpi. Cept that there are more places to fail.
 

Colorado Boy-74-FJ40

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TPI shoots a mist right into the cylinder itself and makes for a really good burn. At high altitudes you get much less air and tend to run a bit rich. The TPI has a more sensitive fuel schedule ( The injectors don't dump as much fuel as a TBI) It's kind of like trying to drink from fire hose. You also have pressurized fuel delivery right into the cylinder so you have less of a chance to vaporlock under high engine compartment heat situations.
 

Mace

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If you are vaporlocking a TBI unit your fuel pump is in the wrong place or is broken..

TPI is more efficient and a better system. But honestly, if your TBI system runs rich at altitude then it is not set up right....

Individual injectors do not dump as much fuel as a TBI, but all together they do. It is kinda like 8 guys drinkin out of cans or 8 guys drinking out of a big beer bong ;)

TPI is nice. but has more complexity to it and is not as user friendly for most people.
 

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