ARC welder question -

Mace

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AC only which kinda sucks but will make you a better welded in the end.

If you can be clean with an AC machine you are an exceleltn welder ;)


Also, don't plan on doing anything thin..
 

tucker74

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Ya - that's pretty much what I thought, been looking for a smaller MIG ... but then you get into the whole thick thing. What should I be looking for to be able to fix sheetmetal and fab bumpers and whatnot?

Tucker
 
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what i wanna know is...........................................











































where are the pics of the sliders????????????????????? ;) ;)
 

Cube Dweller

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What should I be looking for to be able to fix sheetmetal and fab bumpers and whatnot?
I would look at either the Miller or Lincoln 175amp 220V mig welders. The Miller and Lincoln 175plus have infinite variability in the current control so it's a little more tuneable. The Lincoln promig175 and Hobart are basically retail versions of the above w 4 or 5 steps between settings, so not as tuneable. Look on ebay, there's some decent deals out there.
 
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tucker74

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Ya - I got into this whole business of wanting to Durabak my 40 now ... so I'm trying to sell some junk to pay for it (and make the little lady happy ;)). It all started with cutting the front fenders for the sliders - funny how that works! It will all be lined and slidered by the Roundup (gotta have a goal to workon my junk)!

Tucker

BTW: This all lead me to this thread - want to patch up some stuff before I line it ... hince the welder :D
 
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tucker74 said:
Ya - I got into this whole business of wanting to Durabak my 40 now ... so I'm trying to sell some junk to pay for it (and make the little lady happy ;)). It all started with cutting the front fenders for the sliders - funny how that works! It will all be lined and slidered by the Roundup (gotta have a goal to workon my junk)!

Tucker

BTW: This all lead me to this thread - want to patch up some stuff before I line it ... hince the welder :D

he he he....excuses ;)
 
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I've got a Lincoln AC 225 Stick and a Lincoln 175 Mig. Love them both for different things.

Keep good dry electrodes for a stick. That makes the biggest difference with it. You can always put them in the oven on about 250 for 30 minutes to an hour. You'll be amazed how much better your welds will look.

I still like stick welding.

J.R.
 
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tucker74 said:
Ya - that's pretty much what I thought, been looking for a smaller MIG ... but then you get into the whole thick thing. What should I be looking for to be able to fix sheetmetal and fab bumpers and whatnot?

Tucker
I'm just finishing up a welding class (stick) and I'm wrestling w/ the same decision....it's not easy. Thin sheetmetal and heavy bumpers are 2 different beasts, and no one machine or method is going to do everything well.

For thin sheetmetal you want heat control--you could probably do well w/ lower amperage MIG (some of the big beasts can't be dialed low enough). For the heavier stuff higher amperage MIG would probably serve as well. I like arc, but w/ MIG you don't have to spend time chipping away slag. So if you get a MIG that can handle 22ga to 1/4 " you should be happy. The main thing is practice, practice, practice. As my instructor says, "it's not the machine, it's the welder". I've learned a lot from the class that I never would have figured out on my own.

The best for heat control is TIG (next course for me) but it's slower and expensive. My first machine will probably be an arc/TIG combo--that gives me arc for heavy/coarse work, TIG for thin sheet metal and cromoly tubing.
But I'll probably get a big MIG someday, cause chipping slag gets old, especially when it goes down your collar!
 
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