ARB rear bumper (1 Viewer)

Joined
Jan 7, 2010
Messages
330
 
 
I recently got an ARB rear modular bumper installed, I like the weight and toughness of it. However, I was wondering the occupants would sustain more injuries in a fwy. speed rear collision with this ARB bumper because it's directly mounted to the frame (per instruction). Doee the OEM bumper "absorb" the impace better? Is there some sort of "crumple zone" built into the OEM bumper under the plastic skin??? Any thoughts? :confused:
 
Joined
Jan 7, 2006
Messages
9,699
Location
through the river and over the woods.
 
 
hahah you mean a piece of rubbermaid plastic? All there is under the rear bumper skin is a thin piece of metal to create support for stepping on the bumper...nothing to protect from a rear impact. You pretty much didnt change a single thing for rear impact, other than add more steel for them to hit and protect your truck more.
 
Joined
Apr 26, 2010
Messages
52
Location
Chantilly, VA
 
 
In a crash, weight will always WIN...

I have to agree with loud. I was hit over Christmas in my 06 and had to remove the plastic "bumper" cover and the stamped sheet metal beneath it. No protection there my friend.
Just added a Slee rear bumper. Let the next guy that hits me get a bite of that!
I'm not learned regarding crumple and crash zones on cars; but I can tell you that anyone who thinks the rear bumper offers any protection on a stock 100 hasn't seen underneath their rear bumper cover.
Go aftermarket, all metal.:beer:
 
Joined
Apr 26, 2010
Messages
52
Location
Chantilly, VA
 
 
More thoughts...

After re-reading your post, I had a new line of thought. My Slee rear bumper mounts directly in contact with the middle of the rear frame. In a rear end crash where the impact was directly centered, it seems to me that all of the energy would be transferred through the bumper into the frame without any loss of energy. Its metal onto metal with no "crumple"area.

The corners, however, are a different story I think; as the rear bumper sides would offer considerably more protection and would bend under harsh impact.

Any other thoughts out there?
 

jonharis

Adventure Imports
Joined
Jan 24, 2010
Messages
3,128
Location
Western Colorado
After re-reading your post, I had a new line of thought. My Slee rear bumper mounts directly in contact with the middle of the rear frame. In a rear end crash where the impact was directly centered, it seems to me that all of the energy would be transferred through the bumper into the frame without any loss of energy. Its metal onto metal with no "crumple"area.

The corners, however, are a different story I think; as the rear bumper sides would offer considerably more protection and would bend under harsh impact.

Any other thoughts out there?
That was my concern before purchasing any bumpers for my truck. You are creating a very rigid surface that didn't go through the millions of dolars worth of crash testing and computer simulation and updating. That said I feel more or less safe in my truck with a front Slee bumper more because it's a freekin' huge truck than anything. There are many instances here and in other backwaters of the interweb depicting lower to moderate speed crashes with custom bumpers. The data isn't really there with the really bad crashes.

Here's a pic of whats under that pretty piece of plastic you have. Not much there in the way of protection but I'm sure it was a thoroughly thought out piece of engineering.

With a steel bumper you use the other vehicles crumple zones ala Smart Car. It only sucks if you hit a concrete wall. But then your probably fawked anyway.

photo.jpg

Don't even think about asking why my cover is off. :flipoff2:
photo.jpg
 
Joined
Jun 22, 2005
Messages
2,138
Location
Atlanta
 
 
 
The frame and body have the crumple zones. If I'm not mistaken, the purpose of the bumpers is just that - to bump. They are flimsy by design. Two cars can bump at low speeds and there's no damage to either car - maybe a scuff. If one of those bumpers were steel - the flimsy (thin metal, foam, cover) is toast. Or, you can bumper a pole, tree, etc. and nothing is damaged. In higher speed collisions, the frame and body to the work - collapsing to protect the occupants.
 
Joined
Aug 18, 2010
Messages
247
Location
Tucson, AZ
 
 
The bumpers are designed to protect the occupants of both vehicles in a collision. A 3/16 steel plate bumper or tube bumper is designed to protect you and your truck.

That being said, You aren't going to notice anything you hit unless it's a 3/4 ton truck or larger with an aftermarket plate bumper. Your bumper is going to squash the other vehicle.

Here are a few pice of a Tundra vs Avalon. The Avalon didn't see me in the turn lane and someone else waved him through stopped traffic. I was probably going 35.

My 4 and 6 year old were in the back seat. The six year old says "Daddy, did we hit something?"

I borrowed a pry bar from the firemen, bent the useless bumper out of the way and drove home... The Avalon did not...


Avalon


Tundra
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2009
Messages
1,110
 
 
crumpling metal=diffused energy. in a collision, the energy has to go somewhere.

love the ARB bumpers, but don't ever get in an 'at fault' accident or hit an immovable object. in both, you are toast, but for different reasons.
 

2000UZJ

Where's My Hammer?
Joined
Oct 7, 2008
Messages
8,885
Location
Earth
 
 
mickeyt said:
ARB are crash tested means what?
They crashed several 100's with ARB's to get the certified. A very, very expensive procedure. That is why ARB is the only certified. Slee and Bump it have not done it due to costs.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Top Bottom