Anybody vaccinate their own pets?

Discussion in 'Furred - Finned - Feathered' started by flounder, Jun 24, 2005.

  1. flounder

    flounder

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    I got to take my Rottie into the Vet for Rabies vacc. and they told me she was due for an anual parvo/distemper?blah/blah shot. It would be an extra $50 for that. So I got on 1800petmeds and a similar shot is $4.69. I have three dogs so I think I would rather pay $15 versus $150. Anybody do this? It seems like a piece of cake and saves a ton of trouble with dragging everyone to the vet.

    I realize I have to get the rabies vaccine, which I'm cool with but damn, that's alot of cruiser money going to the vet. Maybe I need to change careers.
     
  2. Deep South Cruisers

    Deep South Cruisers 1978 FJ40 ~ 283 V8

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    We used to breed German Shepherds and I always wanted to do my own shots but was worried about the quality and handling of the vaccines. Some require refrigeration and if they get to warm you might as well be giving water shots.

    I paid to have them vet checked but alot of people do their own shots.
     
  3. erics_bruisers

    erics_bruisers

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    It is not illegal for you to vaccinate in most states, except for rabies -- I would check and make sure petmeds can ship it to you --

    -- except for bordatella (kennel cough) and rabies (by law), I would not vaccinate over 1 year --

    eric
     
  4. Critter

    Critter

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    Yes I do except for rabies, which has to be administered by a Veterinarian here by law. Which also has to be given yearly here no matter if the vaccine is good for 1 or 3 years.

    Make sure you keep detailed records of when you gave it and what vaccine it was, the bottle is designed as a single dose and you can pull the label off and stick it to a record. This will at least be reassurance to the Veterinarian that he/she has in fact received their vaccination.

    It needs to be given sub-qutaneously (below the skin) but not in the muscle and you need to pull back on the syringe before injecting to make sure you didn’t hit a blood vessel. When you order the vaccination there will be a package insert with it, make sure you read the directions carefully to assure that it is administered properly.

    Look for a good 5 or 7 way vaccine such as Duramune (Fort Dodge), Galaxy (Schering-Plough), etc.

    The vaccine will be shipped with an ice pack and needs to be refrigerated until you are ready to use it.

    Most places you can go down to your local pharmacy and get syringes and needles. You’ll need something in the 3cc range for a syringe and a 22ga or higher ga and it should be a short needle. I think I usually use a 23ga or 25ga in the shortest length I can get.

    You can also buy your own dewormer from Jeffers online or your local feed store.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2005
  5. hank14

    hank14

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    I do, but I am their veterinarian ;) .

    And if you want a good place to spend your cruiser money, try buying a veterinary clinic and running it for a while. I sold my 99 UZJ100, which I bought with 116,000 miles on it, after 18 months of owning it and 2and a half years of owning the business. The business debt and expenses are eating me alive.

    I would have happily let you come in at 9 pm last night to see the Chihuahua that met a moving vehicle (not a cruiser). It, incidentally, is one that hasn't been fully vaccinated, by the owner or us, and we are treating cases of Parvovirus left and right around here.

    We see maybe one in 1000 dogs that are vaccinated that have some form of reaction to the vaccine. When we have vaccinated the dogs at our hospital, we can report the reaction to the manufacturer and they will investigate it. We also treat those patients and have a good record of what they were vaccinated with, so we can alter the vaccine protical in the future. Pet Meds Express and your feed store can't and won't do that, in most cases.
     
  6. erics_bruisers

    erics_bruisers

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    I hear ya on being a vet -- it seems very tough --

    -- and when your phone number gets out there, everyone and their brother wants free vetting --

    -- I remember growing up, my uncle ran a pheasant farm -- not pretty stuff --

    -- he would always try and barter pheasants for vetting with the local vet --

    -- the vet was probably like, "WTF, cash is cash" --

    e
     
  7. hank14

    hank14

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    There's only so many ways to cook a pheasant.

    And my business is just like any other business- you have to make a profit, and if people don't see the value in your service or expertise, you'll only get their business when they get in over their heads. No one questions why Slee charges what he does, or that Urban LC's are top notch, yet most of us here do our own wrenching.

    Some folks use vaccines, spays, and neuters as "lost leaders"- to get your initial business, then charge more for everything else. Other veterinarians charge enough to make a reasonable profit on everything, and reduce the number of price sensitive phone shoppers, thereby decresing their business and stress, being able to spend more time with their clients, and offer better services.
     
  8. flounder

    flounder

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    wow, didn't mean to get you going there hank14. I admire that what you do and it's money well spent for something serious, I'm not complaining about that but I find it hard to pay $50 for something that takes 2 minutes and cost less than 3 bucks for supplies, plus the overhead. I wouldn't have a problem paying $20 bucks for the shot just to know it's done and in their records. At $20, I'm sure there is still at least $10 profit in there. I should not have to have the cost spread to me for other peoples neglegance with their pets. All mine are up to date (the annual just expired 6-15) so I'm not the one that brings the animal in without the proper shots. I highly doubt you would take your cruiser into the dealership and spend $400 for a service that you can do yourself for under $100. I realize everyone has to make a living but I didn't intend for this to turn into this. Sorry man.
     
  9. crushers

    crushers post ho

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    when it comes ot vets, i have great respect for mine. he is hard working, reasonable and trustworthy... if he charged 50% (probably even 100% but don'ttell him that) more than he does i would still go to him.
    i had tried others but never got a "good feeling" from them. you are trusting your babywith a stranger. aska round and see if the vet you are interested in is reputable or not... if so then pay the money.
    when it comes to "cruiser money" a live animal will take the front seat over another part for my old rust buckets...
    well this is the way i see it anyway...
    cheers
     
  10. erics_bruisers

    erics_bruisers

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  11. PabloCruise

    PabloCruise SILVER Star

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    I don't think you ruffled hank's feathers. But you got me thinking...

    I work in business development. One of my clients is a DVM (vet) and she owns her own clinic. I got a glimpse of the veterinary industry after working at a veterinary products company.

    For my capstone course in my MBA, I did an industry analysis of the small animal (dog, cat, exotics), private practice veterinarian. I learned a lot that makes me respect these professionals immensely.

    Do you know how much school you have to go through to become a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine? First of all, it took me years to just spell "veterinarian" :) But seriously, they need 4 years of medical school, just like human doctors. How many species do MD's work on? ONE! DVM's? Multiple. Think of studying drug pathways and how they differ between canine, feline, equine, porcine, bovine, etc...

    So after an intensive medical school experience, guess how the industry pays? Low. Lower than any other medical profession. So they have some of the highest educational debt, and the lowest salaries. Want to try to open a small business on that? These folks are not in it for the $$$.

    Part of your vaccination experience is a check-up. Flounder, are you going to stick that thermometer up your Rottweiler's butt before vaccinating? Check heart and lung function? Do you know how to avoid creating injection site sarcomas? The vet's job is to protect your animal's health. If your Rotti is sick, vaccination could be bad, and mean complications.

    I get to witness surgeries and dental procedures. The amount of equipment, training and materials necessary to keep the patient healthy is amazing. I once commented that they had some cool “tools”. She looked at me and told me she uses "instruments" on her patients. Not tools, like on a Cruiser! Too funny…

    Believe me Flounder, I am a cheap mo-fo. But there is nothing I can do myself at 11 PM when my Golden Retriever's stomach flipped and closed itself off. My vet x-rayed, confirmed the condition and called ahead to the emergency surgery clinic. There is no way I could diagnose lymphoma in the same dog myself. Or try chemo. Or get her healthy again after the chemo damn near killed her. Or replace hips in my German Shepherd. Or fix a kitty that was hit by a car, and then give the kitty to my Shepherd. And I damn sure couldn't make the decision myself that I had to let go of my Shepherd... Sorry, personal rant off.

    $50 for a vaccination may be a long term success strategy to keeping your Rotti healthy. They can keep an eye out for any changes. Good luck. My mom just lost her 10.5 year old Rotti a few weeks ago. She is not happy. So take good care of your pupper. It is a big responsibility
     
  12. hank14

    hank14

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  13. erics_bruisers

    erics_bruisers

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    Flounder, I would still research on the web the merits of these vaccinations over one year old --

    -- maybe your vet can do a vaccine titers test, where they check the blood of your pup and give your dog a vaccine based on its individual needs --

    eric
     
  14. hank14

    hank14

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    I agree with you, Eric. We do not vaccinate every pet every year anymore. Many duration of immunity studies have been done. Some vaccines may last the lifetime of the pet, others only last a short period of time. We just received the first and only USDA approved 3 year distemper-parvo-hepatitis vaccine this week, and will start using it on all adult dogs. If annual titers were more readily available, we would do those on all pets instead of vaccinating. We also have a liability issue to deal with, and if a pet contracts a disease that we told them they did not need a vaccine for (against label directions), I would be liable. If a vaccine causes a serious rection when used according to manufacturer directions, the manufacturer will be liable.
     
  15. JRFJ4-

    JRFJ4-

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    Vets are smarter than people doctors

    I think vets are smarter than regular family doctors. Most family doctors probably only deal with a small number of things. Nothing like vets.

    Half a doctors time is prescribing antibiotics that won't cure sh**. Doctors know this and prescribe drugs anyway. People are so weak they go to the doc every time they get a snotty nose. Antibiotics are highly over used. Most people get sick go to the doctor, get themselves a shot and a steroid pack. In a few days they are better, woo hooo, the doctor cured them. Hell, you'll feel better in a few days anyway. You will be stronger and more against infection if you get over it yourself.


    Vets deal with all animals. Animals can't tell you what's wrong. They can't point and describe stuff.

    That's just my .02, but I think dogs are smarter that 95% of the people in the world too!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    :cheers: J.R.
     
  16. Critter

    Critter

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    No doubt... it is statistically harder to get into most vet schools than it is to get into med school because of the sheer number of applicants vs acepted students and the number of schools in the US. There are only two states with two vet schools, and alot of states don't even have one.
     
  17. flounder

    flounder

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    Pablo, I respect vets and everything they do and my corcern is not that all their prices are high by any means, they are HIGHLY trained and dedicated individuals and none do it for the money. And I'm not generalizing every vet as saying they overcharge for a shot. It might be my particular vet but NEVER have I gone in and dogs temperature has been checked or heart listened to, it's been more of a "wait in here we'll get the shots, less than ten minutes later I'm paying a $350 bill for three dogs and maybe one of them got a rabies vaccine. It might just be my ignorance for not shopping around for a better vet. The only real checkup that has been done was when the Rottie was a pup and they checked for signs of displacia (sp?).

    Again, I value a good vet and have the upmost respect for that profession and if there was something wrong, I would take them to vet with no problem. We spend countless hours with the dogs checking for any and all problems and I pay close attention to the Rottie just due to their track record of having health issues.

    I just was wondering who vaccinated their dog at home :D

    I'm gonna check into that microchip, THAT seems like money well spent.
     
  18. PabloCruise

    PabloCruise SILVER Star

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    Ha! Alright, I'll stand down then. :)

    I am a little concerned that your vet does not take a listen to your dogs breathing and heart.

    Also, you can ask what exactly is on the invoice that you are paying $350 for, you ARE the customer, and it is YOUR money. I fhtey do a good job describing. If you still feel unsure, go shopping!

    Good luck!
     
  19. Jomama

    Jomama

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    I've done the Distemper/Parvo Vaccinations over the years myself, mostly dependent on finding the local "feed store", IFA etc.. that actually carried the appropriate dose. Its a subcutanious injection so kinda tough to mess up the shot part.

    However, I did run into a problem when I then tried to put my dog on a Plane, and to go thru Canada up the Alcan. I didnt have Vet cert that they had these shots, so in one case I had to pay to redo them anyway. If your not gonna have to use a Vet Cert for your 3 hounds anytime soon, I'd be apt to save that money and DIY, your still feeding the Vets dogs with the checkup and Rabies Vac.
     
  20. IDave

    IDave

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    In my town, the family docs set fractures, do appendectomies, administer thrombolytics for MIs and strokes, treat diabetes, pneumonias and blood pressure, do C-sections and deliver babies, often all at the same time.

    They deal with whole worlds of problems that Vets never approach (such as half of those on my list above), either because cost, common sense and psychology do not permit the very consideration of those issues in the treatment of animals.

    It is true, that patients will often demand antibiotics, and if one doctor won't prescribe them, another one will, and patients know this and doctor shop until they get what they want. That is one more problem that Vets don't deal with often.

    I have all sorts of respect for Vets and what they do. But it is naive to compare what is apples and oranges.
     
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