Anti-Seize vs Moly Grease (1 Viewer)

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OK, so I had never tried anything mechanical till around 3 years ago when I got my beater 97 80 :flipoff2:. Now I'm trying to do as much as I can myself (still not enough though).

I've been using some moly grease on every bolt and thread I ever touch on my rig. Also filled all the electrical connections (after a submersion and WD40 cleanup) with dielectric grease.

Now folks are starting to talk up this Anti-Seize stuff. Well, it's more expensive, harder to find and I already have tubs and tubs of moly in the garage.

Is there really a difference? Worth it to go the extra distance and hassle to use the anti-seize?

Thanks. :cheers:
 

Cruiserdrew

On the way there
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I think that the antiseize is better. The grease has to be better than nothing, but eventually the oil separates form the soap and runs out. The anti-seize doesn't seem to rely on the grease-the powered graphite does the job. Get a bottle of permatex with the brush-it lasts forever even with liberal use. I'm still only on the second bottle I ever purchased. I put it on almost everything I take apart and reassemble. Its good stuff.
 
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drew is right, the anti-sieze is better and lasts longer. The grease will seperate or cook out under heat. The anti-seize only uses the oil or grease as a carrier to congeal the compound for application. The silvery color is powdered aluminum (in permatex) which does not bond to steel thus providing a barrier between parts. Even after the grease or oil is cooked out under svere heat the part is still free. It is also available in Copper, Stainles steel, Nickel, etc from other brands. It is recomended by most all car manufacturers for use on lug studs, under carriage bolts, and e-brake components, among other places. I've been using it on our race bikes and 4x4s for decades and swear by the stuff.
 
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I'm sure this is heresy, but I use the copper variety to "help" out on electrical contacts too. For example, the PS side door-jam light switch failed to make good contact with the frame, despite the bolt being nice and snug (it's a grounding point too). Had to clean the bugger about every six months. Problem was the ground wasn't good enough and after a while, the light would flicker as you drive along, even though the door was fully closed.

A little dab of the copper flavored anti-seize and I have had no problems with it in over two years now. :D
 
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di·e·lec·tric ( P ) Pronunciation Key (d-lktrk)
n.
A nonconductor of electricity, especially a substance with electrical conductivity of less than a millionth (10-6) of a siemens.
 
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anyone want to tell me what type of grease conducts electricity. lithium, zinc oxide? i ask for dielectric and they look blankly
 
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Bad:

Sorry, can't answer re lithium or zinc oxide, but know what you mean when they stare blankly. Ask for "tuneup grease" - that's another name for the dielectric grease. I use it liberally on connectors to help waterproof them and prevent corrosion.

Eric
 
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Are you guys talking about the grease or goo you put on the back of a semiconducter so that it increases the heat-conducting properties (i.e., it carries the heat to the heat conductor or circuit board)? Thought that was called something else... :rolleyes:
 
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I use the copper variety of anti-seize. I used it on the cone washers at the front that were a right pain to get off the first time. Now it's easier to take apart but still doesn't come apart unless I want it too. It now lives in my toolbox for regular use. The grease or oil tends to wash away. Anti-seize that I used several years ago is still there and visible when the parts are dis-assembled.
 
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I know for sure that anti sieze works better. I buy the NAPA brand in the big tub with a brush. I dont use it much. Anything that will be heated I use it on. Most big things I use lock tight on and all others I use cheapo NAPA grease on. It is a good idea to use it on all parts. I cannot hurt :flipoff2: On my truck I should use it on every bolt I turn. That is assuming I turn any bolts on my trucks
 
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Wow! Misinformation abounds.

I am an anti-seize junkie - it goes on eevrything except brake bleeder srews. I have had a can of the aluminum colored stuff for years now. I have a tube of the high heat copper stuff too. I f I am not putting antiseize on, it is either getting Loc-tite, plain oil (head bolts) or nothing (brake bleeders).

Dielectric grease is a non-conductiing grease - used for sealing connectors, wiring etc.

The paste on the back of semi conductors is a HEAT conductive paste that allows better transfer to the heat sinks.

As an aside on anti seize: a couple of years ago, I cracked a ramshorn manifold on my 40. I allowed myself 2 hours to change it. To my surprise, every bolt spun right out. I goobered the replacement with ultra copper gasket maker, recoated the bolts with anti-seize and was done in less than 1/2 hour.

WHen I saw the topic, my assumption was the thread was going to be which one spreads faster ( kind of like roofing tar - you get some on you and pretty soon it is everywhere.

Jim
 
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[quote author=TLCObsession link=board=14;threadid=9083;start=msg82109#msg82109 date=1072812237]
Wow! Misinformation abounds.

I am an anti-seize junkie - it goes on eevrything except brake bleeder srews. I have had a can of the aluminum colored stuff for years now. I have a tube of the high heat copper stuff too. I f I am not putting antiseize on, it is either getting Loc-tite, plain oil (head bolts) or nothing (brake bleeders).

Dielectric grease is a non-conductiing grease - used for sealing connectors, wiring etc.

The paste on the back of semi conductors is a HEAT conductive paste that allows better transfer to the heat sinks.

As an aside on anti seize: a couple of years ago, I cracked a ramshorn manifold on my 40. I allowed myself 2 hours to change it. To my surprise, every bolt spun right out. I goobered the replacement with ultra copper gasket maker, recoated the bolts with anti-seize and was done in less than 1/2 hour.

WHen I saw the topic, my assumption was the thread was going to be which one spreads faster ( kind of like roofing tar - you get some on you and pretty soon it is everywhere.

Jim
[/quote]

Wow! What Misinformation abounds? Please be specific. I really dont see what you added to the thread.
 
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Bob,

I use it on my spark plugs--I use the copper stuff. Never had a problem with it, though I use it sparingly and am sure not to get any on the business end of the plug.

Tom
 

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I use Caterpillar high-temp anti-seize on just about everything

part number 4C-5599.

I have used this on all spark plugs, steel or aluminum heads, and have gotten it on the "buisness end" of it, and not had a problem.

I have used it on wheel cylinder adjusting screws for years, and not had any issues either.

Good luck!

-Steve
 
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[quote author=dd113 link=board=14;threadid=9083;start=msg82425#msg82425 date=1072850290]
Wow! What Misinformation abounds? Please be specific. I really dont see what you added to the thread.
[/quote]

Well maybe not abounds but this is the one that got me:

anyone want to tell me what type of grease conducts electricity. lithium, zinc oxide? i ask for dielectric and they look blankly


Oh and as mentioned anti-seize is fine on spark plugs, and some would say really necessary when putting a plated steel plug into an AL head....
 

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