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air brushing skills

Discussion in 'Chit-Chat' started by Scarecrow, Jul 24, 2005.

  1. Scarecrow

    Scarecrow

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    have any of you air brushed before? im about to try it out and want to get good. are there any good tips from you guys or concerns i need to look for before starting? im gonna practice on scrap stuff for a while, so any tips would be great.

    Sean
     
  2. archie

    archie

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    I'd say try to go to a public library and see if they got anything there. Try some of their techniques in the books. Hopefully somebody with experience can add more to this topic especially with basic equipment and which brands to steer away from.
     
  3. Scarecrow

    Scarecrow

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    the library...thats that place with all those books right? :D thats a good idea, i never even thought about that. i think ill hit that up tomorow. any hands on experience out there?

    sean
     
  4. FirstToy

    FirstToy

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    I did several helmets and various other stuff. Much of it is in frisket. 90% cutting frisket, 10% spraying.
    If you get impatient w/ masking then you will botch the job. I have found that pinstrping enhances custom work by 10fold. GOOD pinstriping, hand lettering, accents is truly an art so if you really want it to shine, do your base and hire a pinstriper to detail it; then clearcoat it.

    If this is for body panels, I would not attempt any handwork even w/ several yrs experience. I would hire someone w/ 10+ yrs doing hotrods.

    Get a good compressor and the next big choice is your paint. Experiment w/ laquer, urethanes (harder b/c of the harder additive), even good water based paints now.-- and also w/ pearls, metallics,chameleon, etc. Remember you can shoot very dry b/c you will be clearcoating which will add all the gloss.

    experiment w/ all the stages, not just spraying the airbrush. Good luck!
     
  5. Gus

    Gus SILVER Star

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    I don't have any first hand experience with air brushing, I was taught how to use one back in Tech school. We had the air brush artist Steve Vandemon visit the school and show off some of his skills, his website is www.Vandemon.com the guy could do some very sweet stuff (and make it look pretty easy).
     
  6. swank60

    swank60

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    I've done it on a limited basis. What is it that you are wanting to know, and what are you going to be painting? Any advice would be based on what you're going to be doing with the airbrush...

    As far as brands go, the two standards are Badger and Paasche. Both are good, but if you go with a Badger, get a double action brush only. Paasche makes good double and single action brushes, but are much more sensitive and need to be kept very clean. Iwata makes a nice brush, too, but they are expensive. Not knowing what you are doing, I can't recommend either a gravity feed or suction typr brush...but when you get a brush, they are very customizable. I use different hoses, have a counter-balance handle on my detail brush, on the Badger brush I used to have, I didn't use a handle at all. Also experement with different air hoses - that can make a big difference on how comfortable you are with it.

    Get a small air tank compressor. I use a $90 2 gal Cambell Hausfeld, and it came with a regulator. Only addition needed is a water trap/filter. Don't mess with the cans of compressed air. They are expensive, don't last long and the pressure is inconsistant. You'll want some sort of regulator to manage pressure. Paint weight will determine how much or little pressure you will require. The trap/filter keeps the moisture that the compressor picks up out of the air from blowing through the brush. Most of the air brush companies sell continuous running compressors, but they'll pulse air through the brush from time to time, and tend to 'walk' from the vibration. Best to avoid them...
     
  7. swank60

    swank60

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    Oh, and if you get one of the cheap tank compressors, it will hook right up to the Paasche, but you'd have to buy an adapter for the Badger...unless you hooked your Badger AB up to a Paasche hose (then you need the adapter for the brush, not the compressor, which is what I used to do with my old Badger)
     
  8. archie

    archie

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    How come you don't suggest a larger (ex. 20 gal) compressor tank? It could justify buying air tools :)
     
  9. swank60

    swank60

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    Well, if you're going to AB in your garage, sure, why not. For me, that's a bit much to run in my office... :D
     
  10. brian

    brian SILVER Star

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    i was just starting to pick some skill up when i quit doing the "fine" work.....