Advice: How much should I pay for half of 2f engine rebuild process

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Hi All,

I'm pulling the plug on a mechanic that's been taking far too long (like 4 months) to do an engine rebuild process for me on my 2f. He disassembled everything 5 months ago and the engines been sitting at a machine shop ever since. I want to move the process to Boulder CO with me and find someone else to help me with it, maybe even a mud member. curious what you all think is a fair price for me to pay for pulling of the engine on an 85 FJ60 and the typical ballpark labor hours and cost.

Also, since the machine shop hasn't done much to the engine I think I might pull it form there or just have them do the actual machining work and Ill do the reassembly myself. How much should just having them do the machine work cost ballpark?

Also if anyone can speak from experience, How s***ty is it going to be to ship the engine and truck with parts all over the place? Should I have them bolt the non rebuilt motor back in just for hauling it to CO?

Last question---- is it worth the effort to ship everything that way I can have the experience of doing it myself and getting it done sooner and not be disrespected with all the time its taking?

Beehanger
 
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A few thoughts, perhaps entirely unconstructive…

1. Are you able to contact the machinist directly? Can you show up at the shop and talk to them and have a real moment with them? Maybe they can expedite your project if they have a gauge of your situation.

I’ve been fortunate enough to avoid machine work in the last couple of years, but machinists have been good to me in the past when I’ve put a face behind my pile of parts.

2. $1800 seems a little steep for a 2F engine, but that’s not WAY too bad if that person is willing to install it for you and make sure you’re driving away from their house. I think $12-1500 would be more reasonable—work included.

* Admittedly, I’ve only been in the diesel LandCruiser market, but a diesel 3B engine (which is probably about as desirable as a 2F) would go for closer to $1000.

3. The fastest way to lose money on this project is to cut your losses and sell it as parts.

If you can get the truck running, even with an engine you know nothing about, you can sell this within a week on craigslist or Facebook marketplace as long as your asking price is within the limits of this terrestrial plane and not some astronomical amount.

I feel terribly for the situation you are in, and I think your best bet is to do whatever you can to get any running engine in the truck as soon as possible.
 
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I Think you should do all of rest of the work yourself…BUT BEFORE you burn any bridges, make CERTAIN you can get ahold of all the necessary parts.

My machinists pulled me out of a big hole after he & I decided I would need new pistons & rings after all. I was on a major time crunch to get it all done by a certain date (another story) and I by myself was unable to find the certain sized pistons I required. With his knowledge & contacts he was able to come thru and they arrived just in time. So, don’t burn your bridges.

As for the actual install of the engine into your rig…it’s not that hard really. FSM, common sense, YouTube and maybe a friend or 2 to help with the muscle & it can easily be accomplished in 3 long days of work…start to fire it up.

One day to basically get the engine in the engine bay & mostly installed, the next day to button it all up, connect all the wires etc, a bit more messing with it on the 3rd day and fire it up that day also.

$2k to install is crazy…it’s NOT that difficult. Think of the $$ you will be saving.
I dig this. what FSM do you recommend?
 

John McVicker

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^^^
Toyota Engine FSM.

It can be had on line & then you print it out to always be at your side during assembly. Follow its instructions religiously. Be neat, be methodical and be very clean & organized.

Sorry, I do not have the link to the FSM. Hopefully someone will provide it.
 

2mbb

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"wanting to do it" for the experience and having the means to do it are entirely different. rebuilding an engine is not difficult, but it does take attention to detail as John points out above. Add to that the fact that someone else took the engine apart. You will have a much harder time determining what part goes back where. Do you have the tools to use or would you have to purchase them? Will you have a suitable place to do the work? And you mention this is your only car and presumably you do need a car, so there will be a sense of urgency. these are realistic issues you will face that have nothing to do with your desire or your capability.

If you do want to give this a try (which I think is great!) my recommendation would be to first get another reliable car for your daily driver. If nothing else this will give you the means to go to your job to make money and take trips to the cheap tool store to bring back home items like engine stands that you will need to complete the rebuilding process to get your Land Cruiser running again so you can use it to haul around large items.

Read through the rebuilding process in the FSM (Factory Service Manual). Understand what it takes and what tools and other resources you will need to be successful.
 

John McVicker

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All good points as described by @2mbb, and while all of us are suggesting you go for it, it is not for the faint of heart.

And not necessarily opposite of what I suggested above regarding 3 days…do not count on starting Friday evening after work and think you will be driving it to work on Monday. If all goes well you can fire it up after 3 long days of methodical work…but there is still a bunch of fidilling to accomplish.

Doa load the Engine FSM, look it over and make a well thought out…and honest…assessment of if you believe you can accomplish what needs to be done. And go from there.

Do you have a friend that canbe there with you from start to end? If so, it’s a great help.
 
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H8MUD Resources tab in the page header.
"wanting to do it" for the experience and having the means to do it are entirely different. rebuilding an engine is not difficult, but it does take attention to detail as John points out above. Add to that the fact that someone else took the engine apart. You will have a much harder time determining what part goes back where. Do you have the tools to use or would you have to purchase them? Will you have a suitable place to do the work? And you mention this is your only car and presumably you do need a car, so there will be a sense of urgency. these are realistic issues you will face that have nothing to do with your desire or your capability.

If you do want to give this a try (which I think is great!) my recommendation would be to first get another reliable car for your daily driver. If nothing else this will give you the means to go to your job to make money and take trips to the cheap tool store to bring back home items like engine stands that you will need to complete the rebuilding process to get your Land Cruiser running again so you can use it to haul around large items.

Read through the rebuilding process in the FSM (Factory Service Manual). Understand what it takes and what tools and other resources you will need to be successful.
I'll give it a read. Thank you. What Large Items are you referring to the LC hauling? Are you speaking of other projects that will come after engine install?
 

2mbb

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I'll give it a read. Thank you. What Large Items are you referring to the LC hauling? Are you speaking of other projects that will come after engine install?
I was trying to provide an image of the irony of owning a utilitarian vehicle (land cruiser) but not being able to use it as such. Of course I don't know your particular situation. This may be neither important nor ironic. You may be able to borrow a truck. You may have access to someone else's auto shop.

I am a full believer in "doing it yourself" as I think most of us are on this forum. You have been honest with us that you have never done much of this before and are in the process of relocating, which implies you may not have an appropriate work space. I think what is important is to provide advice that will likely have a successful outcome. I'm not trying to discourage you. But i would like you to be successful!
 

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