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AC service, ND-Oil8 and plugging lines

Discussion in '80-Series Tech' started by Riley, Jul 7, 2005.

  1. Riley

    Riley

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    I've been slowly working to get my AC fixed. I guessed (wrong) that it was the engine over-temp sensor.

    My next step was to take it to the dealer and their tests show that the system is blocked and their guess is that it's the expansion valve (but no promises).

    Note: They first bragged that they could get the expansion valve here in Canada in a day. They said most parts for 80 series cruisers would take about 6 weeks to bring into Canada :rolleyes:. I was tempted to tell them to just call C-Dan and get pretty well anything in 4 days.

    I've decided to replace the expansion valve (and dryer) myself and then have someone recharge the system.

    In reading the FSM I see that I need some oil is needed during the connection of the fittings ect... They call for ND-Oil8.

    Question #1 is: Where should I get this ND-Oil8 from? Dealer? or ?

    Question #2 is: They recommand to seal off the lines to prevent mositure and dirt from entering the system while it's open. Any recommendations on how to plug the lines? anything special?

    Any other tips for expansion valve replacement are welcome. Reading the FSM doesn't sound too bad. The dealer wanted like $600 Canadian (including recharge). :eek:
     
  2. Lars

    Lars

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    ND-Oil 8 is Nippon Denso's version of PAG 46 oil (which might be more commonly available).


    ackits.com has a great forum with extremely knowledgeable folks. You might want to try your questions there.
     
  3. Rich

    Rich

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    If you want to do the parts replacement yourself I'd suggest that you search out a AC shop. Tell them you want them to evacuate the system, and that you will be back after you swap parts for them to evacuate again and recharge. Buy the oil from them and get them to sell or loan you the plugs. In this instance I would think that an AC shop will have equal or greater expertise than a dealer shop, and probably a better labor rate.

    All that being said, I would think that auto parts stores can supply the oil. And I would think anything that can plug the line and not crumble, flake, or otherwise contaminate the system would do.
     
  4. IdahoDoug

    IdahoDoug

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    With plugging, all you're trying to do is prevent anything falling in, and unwanted air exchange (it's dry in there, outside air contains trace moisture). I think you're doing the right thing. Years ago I opened my system by pulling a metal line to replace the O ring. Then I went straight to the dealer for an evacuation/recharge (I believe these are done together always).

    DougM
     
  5. elmariachi

    elmariachi

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    IMO, this is the best method. They will add oil when they recharge the system for you and you won't have to worry with it. FYI, it takes 5 minutes to remove the passenger front seat, and that makes tearing into the dash a WHOLE lot easier and quicker.
     
  6. Riley

    Riley

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    Thanks guys, good advice. I'll call around some of the shops and see what they say. Seems weird that they are all radiator and AC shops (don't seem that related to me).


    Jim - I didn't want the oil to add myself, just to put on the seals and threads ect.. during reassembly.

    So I guess having the system excuated to begin with is to be nice to mother earth? I guess R134 is still hard on the ozone layer?
     
  7. Rich

    Rich

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    I don't know if it is required to recycle R134 or not.
     
  8. IdahoDoug

    IdahoDoug

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    I'm no expert, but I've heard that 134 is *barely* any better for the environment than the R-12 was, but it's not as effective at cooling pound for pound. That was a total BS bill of goods the world was sold, for marginal change. My wife and I have noticed that the 93's A/C (R12) cools notably better than the 97s and they're both in top shape.
     
  9. flintknapper

    flintknapper

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    I've done a few 134a conversions the right way (parallel condensor, new manifold lines, new compressor, pumped down within an inch of its life, etc) but in my experience....R-12 still beats it hands down!
     
  10. Rich

    Rich

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    Yep, R12 is well known to be more effective. For that reason there is ongoing research to replace R134 with something better.
     
  11. Riley

    Riley

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    Well I should try to evacute it then if it's not that much better.
     
  12. IdahoDoug

    IdahoDoug

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    Riley,

    I have no idea what you just said, or why. Grin.

    DougM
     
  13. flintknapper

    flintknapper

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    I just want to be cool!


    Yeah, I've read about several of the alternative refrigerants, but I can't post anything about them because "Semlin" will accuse me of having an "A/C system fixation".

    I'm ready for something that gets the job done though.
     
  14. Riley

    Riley

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    I meant, if R134 is still bad for the enviroment then I should dispose of it properly. that's all.
     
  15. Atticus

    Atticus

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    Riley,
    I don't post often, because I am a lurker who has little to contribute, but I just wanted to tell you that my '94's A/C system cut off on me all of a sudden, and was showing signs of being plugged somewhere. Took it to my mechanic, and he hooked up the machine, which registered the plug, and he was convinced that it was the expansion valve. Anyway, it turned out that it just needed a little bit of a charge to get going. Ended up being a 20 dollar fix instead of a 300 dollar fix for me. Lesson here is: before you crack anything open, be completely sure that the system is fully charged.

    Cheers and good luck,
    Jay
     
  16. Riley

    Riley

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    Small update here and a thanks.

    I followed Rich's suggestion of going to an AC shop instead of the dealer. They spent 30 minutes with the truck and myself and checked out the system. They confirmed that it does look like the expansion valve but chatting about this (and that I would do the repair myself), they exvacuted the system for me. Also mentioned I should replace the dryer (which I knew after consulting with C-Dan and my learnings here).

    All this for no charge, they will catch me on the flip side when they recharge the system.

    They also mentioned to clean the back of the condensor? (rad looking thing) and I should replace the fan coupler to make sure I'm drawing enough outside through the condensor.

    Anyway my trip to the dealer (for $100) ended up being expensive and not very helpful (mind you both parties agree it's likely the expansion valve). Independent shops are much easier to partner with when you're doing some of the work yourself.

    Besides all that we talked about the local fishing conditions and chewed the fat. Man I like dealing with good old local guys. :D
     
  17. Rich

    Rich

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    Riley, while you are replacing the receiver dryer, you may wish to consider a modification while you are at it. The receiver dryer hangs a bit low, and a couple of lucky guys have managed to rip open the ac line by snagging it on the rocks.

    Last weekend I moved mine up 1½ inches, which, while not sounding like a lot, raises it up quite a bit higher than the bottom of the bumper. As part of this operation, I cut off the lower 2¼ inches of the mount, as there wouldn't be much benefit to leaving the mount hanging low. An unmodified mount snagged on a rock would still likely rip out the ac line. The parking light limits how high the receiver dryer can be raised. 1½ inches is about the max.

    There are a three minor tweaks required to move up the receiver dryer: 1) the AC lines need to be slightly bent. This requires care, as they are thin aluminum and could easily be crushed. 2) The mount itself needs to be twisted so that the raised receiver dryer clears the sheet metal valance below the grill. With the receiver unclamped from the mount but the mount still bolted to the truck I used a monkey wrench to grab the mount and twist the mount so that the top of the receiver dryer moves closer towards the engine space. This needs to be done to both sides of the mount. The wrench I used looks similar to a pipe wrench but has a couple of important differences - the jaws are perfectly smooth, flat, and parallel. Some care should be taken as the receiver clamp is spot welded to the part you would be bending. You wouldn’t want to have it break loose. 3) You need to slightly bend the tranny coolant lines so that they don’t rub against the receiver dryer lines.

    In order to easily do all of this the bumper, grill, valance, and driver side lights - head, turn, and parking lights need to be removed. I think you probably need to remove all of the above anyway to replace your receiver dryer, so it shouldn’t be much extra work. If you wish to pursue this, you might try it first with your old receiver dryer to get a feel for bending the lines – a soft touch is required.