A stand-in gas tank?

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Joined
Mar 17, 2019
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Is there a different Toyota gas tank that will work for a late-model ('82) 40 series? Anybody ever replace a bad tank with one from a similar year mini truck? ...or will one from an older model 40 series possibly work?

Situation is my original tank has a bunch of pin holes...mechanic says replacing it looks easier than repairing, but finding a new (from Toyota) or used (from scrapyard) direct replacement is proving impossible...so am looking for a "nearly the same" solution that might be available locally (not USA). I have about 4 weeks before the truck needs to go into the container for my change of station, so buying one of the perfectly good looking ones from a US provider is not, unfortunately, a realistic option.

Any suggestions very much welcomed! Thanks!

p.s. Have pored over FAQ and checked a bunch of threads, but haven't seen anything that talks about this...
 
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Oem and oem style tanks are readily available, early and 79 +models

i do not recommend a use one or a plastic one, and if the tank has rust i would inspect the rest of ur fuel system.


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aftermarket tank, I don't think has a drain in it, but other than that it fits , so other that have used it have said.
good used is the other option but it would be as much as the new aftermarket version.
next would be what kind of shape your pickup tube is in.
 
My Downey tank shown above gets you 22 gallons in a nylon tank that was laboratory tested stronger than a steel tank, no welded seams, and will never rust-- - - - - - -just saying.
 
I’d go with a Downey tank or one from Marks Off Road.

Alternatively some have mounted a Blazer or S10 fuel tank behind the rear axle. If you are paying a mechanic it wouldn’t likely save you anything since mounts will need to be fabricated.
 
with any of the tanks behind the axle, the PO will need to do exhaust re-routing also as that is where the muffler is located.
 
with any of the tanks behind the axle, the PO will need to do exhaust re-routing also as that is where the muffler is located.


Even with the pre 75 exhaust the tailpipe is right on top of the tank in the back. SOR use to sell and still may a tailpipe that had a offset to help clear the aux tank. My 79 is non operating right now and picked up a 82 tub and frame. Owner didn't get the tank removed before I bought it. I removed the drain plugs in both so I know no moisture is building up which isn't a problem in the desert. If I had a 79+ 40 series would be sure I kept the original 22 1/2 gallon tank even if it meant getting a aftermarket tank and installing the drain from the OEM tank. Personally not a fan off aftermarket tank in the back. On two track trails they effect.rear departure.
 
Where are you located? I have a spare late model gas tank. It didn’t have any leaks when I pulled it. You can have it if you can pick it up. It came out of a BJ42 by the way.
 
Where are you located? I have a spare late model gas tank. It didn’t have any leaks when I pulled it. You can have it if you can pick it up. It came out of a BJ42 by the way.
That's a very kind offer -- thank you! One of the several really great things about this community and website is the way everybody helps out everybody else. Sorry, though, that I'm located in Paraguay, South America...in a few months, my BJ43 will be in Vermont...but I've got to get it running, first! Thanks, again!
 
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Not sure what shipping would be, but I put the Spectra tank in mine. It was $180 at Rock Auto. I acquired a used OEM shortly after, and was going to swap it in for the drain, but decided to keep the Spectra and sold the used tank.

As far as other options, my opinion would avoid putting a gas tank behind the rear axle. There have been a number of recalls due to fire/explosion risk with tanks mounted behind the axle.

While I understand the desire to do so, especially if you get a much larger tank (like the massive long range off-road tanks that sit behind the rear axle on the 60 and up Land Cruisers). I don't see the desire for a same size tank (22 gallons) that mounts in a more dangerous position like the Downey tank.
 
Wow Spokane, so then I guess the thousands of FJ40 owners that have been using Downey, Con Ferr, Calif. Custom tanks behind the rear diff for the last 50 years are in real peril ???
 
Wow Spokane, so then I guess the thousands of FJ40 owners that have been using Downey, Con Ferr, Calif. Custom tanks behind the rear diff for the last 50 years are in real peril ???

There have been thousands of recalls from the major manufacturers for tanks behind the rear axle as well as multi-million dollar lawsuits. Chrysler, Jeeps, and of course, the Pinto all come to mind.


 
There have been thousands of recalls from the major manufacturers for tanks behind the rear axle as well as multi-million dollar lawsuits. Chrysler, Jeeps, and of course, the Pinto all come to mind.




While not a fan of the rear aux tank it's because of exhaust and departure clearance. Not sure about the 200 series but from the 60-100 series the fuel cell is behind the rear axle above the spare tire. All these are framed vehicles not unibody vehicles. Think the stout frame of the LC offers quite a bid of protection to the tank. Also in years (1974) of searching wrecking yards have never come across a pre 1/79 FJ40 that the fuel tank showed signs of a fire. Personally like the 1/79 the best, largest capacity, outside the cab, no rear departure loss and exhaust run outside the frame away the tank.
 
While not a fan of the rear aux tank it's because of exhaust and departure clearance. Not sure about the 200 series but from the 60-100 series the fuel cell is behind the rear axle above the spare tire. All these are framed vehicles not unibody vehicles. Think the stout frame of the LC offers quite a bid of protection to the tank. Also in years (1974) of searching wrecking yards have never come across a pre 1/79 FJ40 that the fuel tank showed signs of a fire. Personally like the 1/79 the best, largest capacity, outside the cab, no rear departure loss and exhaust run outside the frame away the tank.

I agree the risk is lower with a more stout frame. However, the old Grand Cherokee recall had a fairly solid frame. The fix was to add a hitch, even though many that caught on fire had hitches.

The Jeep Liberty had the same issue, and it had a plastic tank that was more easily punctured, and melted under heat leading to explosions. he 200 stock tank is inside the axle and the long range are in the spare location (keep stock tank). Looks like a great upgrade.

I have seen how stout the LROR 60 rear tank is, it is stout. The only concern is a fast rear end collision.

Again, I can completely understand putting in a much larger tank for overlanding, etc. Especially on a gas guzzler like any LC. I also agree the late 40 tank is in a perfect spot. My point was, that a tank behind the rear axle definitely creates more risk to passengers, and putting a tank with the same capacity as stock just doesn't make sense to me with the added risk of a more exposed tank.
 
Think the last Cherokee with a frame was 1982. The old wagoneer had a frame until 1991. Other than the CJ, DJ, TJ, YJ and what ever the current one is called have a frame. Everything else is unibody.
 
Is it possible to use a small fuel cell just to get it into/out of the container then get what you want once in the US and more time is on your side?
 
Is it possible to use a small fuel cell just to get it into/out of the container then get what you want once in the US and more time is on your side?
Thanks! I suspect that convincing USCBP and DoT to allow it into the US, and the DMV that it's roadworthy and ready to license, may be hard without a permanently mounted fuel tank. Still, never say never, as that may end up being my route forward!
 
Mack, I think your path of least resistance is the 22 gallon rear fuel cell as your one and only stand-alone gas tank- - -easy deal.
 
Mack, I think your path of least resistance is the 22 gallon rear fuel cell as your one and only stand-alone gas tank- - -easy deal.


Personally think an aftermarket direct replacement would be the easiest solution. If it currently has emissions hook ups in Paraquay would think to get it into the US those would need to be hooked up. That is a lot of rerouting of fuel lines. Having to add a full neck and have fill door no longer used by the B pillar. Plus exhaust modifications. Something that will bolt up in the OEM location and have all the correct connections on the tank sounds pretty easy. I know it doesn't have a drain plug like the OEM tank but I have never come across a rear aux tank in the back that had a drain either.
 
Personally think an aftermarket direct replacement would be the easiest solution. If it currently has emissions hook ups in Paraquay would think to get it into the US those would need to be hooked up. That is a lot of rerouting of fuel lines. Having to add a full neck and have fill door no longer used by the B pillar. Plus exhaust modifications. Something that will bolt up in the OEM location and have all the correct connections on the tank sounds pretty easy. I know it doesn't have a drain plug like the OEM tank but I have never come across a rear aux tank in the back that had a drain either.

I'd see if there is a local radiator shop that could seal up your current tank if you can't easily source a replacement. Then find a used tank on Mud or the Spectra tank when you get to the states.
 

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