A little (lot) of advice needed-Engine removal with tranny or w/o?

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Louisville, Kentucky
Gerring ready to pull engine for first time. Getting ready to remove donor from my rust bucket and out it into my rust free frame and body. Both are 1985 60s (October). Reading about pulling engine with or without tranny. What do you think? Also, the mechanic who was going to help me backed out last minute but I've decided to move forward. Getting help from brother. Neither have pulled an engine before. FSM and Haynes don't offer a lot to get started. Already removed rad and front cross members and have a clear shot. Any and all info, advice, things to avoid are welcome!! Can some provide overview and steps. Please advise....
 
find a buddy who's done a swap before to guide you if you can help it. I vote for pulling in one shot, but it's a heavy high load and without experience doing such things, you might be better off just doing the engine only. the engine only will make fussing with the clutch/input shaft more fun(less fun). pay close attention to all the do's and don'ts you'll find in related threads- there are lots of details and pitfalls- this is why I suggest finding some one who has been there to help. check your local cruiser clubhouse page for meetings and get involved. HTH
 
I pulled mine all at once. Seemed like the right thing to do after consulting this awesome forum.
 
If you pull the whole monster use a 2 ton hoist with load leveler. It's kinda scary seeing a 1 ton hoist bend like it does. The engine+tranny combo is a very unwieldy, extremely heavy 2Fasaurus.

If I was doing it by it myself and had a good tranny jack, I'd drop the tranny first before yanking the engine. The 2Fasaurus is a scary beast to deal with by yourself. Though guys have done it.
 
I've pulled 3F's alone a few times, with chains over a solid roof truss. But I split the tranny, manifolds off first - the combined size & weight is a little intimidating for an amateur.. It's not rocket science, but can't be rushed. Make damn sure all wiring/piping is disconnected and out the way before you start hoisting. How will you move the engine once out? I fabbed up a strong trolley from angle iron, put car tyres on it, lower the engine onto that, strip it on the trolley.
 
I would take it out in one shot . I have done it by myself more times than I can count . Not that hard . Make sure everything is disconnected and out of the way . It is good to get a balance point when you first lift . The engine should lift off the mounts first . When the engine mounts are just off the frame check the t-case and see how much weight is still there . I sometimes use a floor jack under the tail so I can lift the combo angled tail down . Adjustable spreader bar would be the ideal thing . I have done it enough I know where the balance point is so it is not an issue with out one .
 
Rent/Buy a sturdy two-ton hoist if you're going to lift out as a pair. One-ton will be OK if you separate the trans first and remove all accessories. You will need to extend the boom as far as it will go. Use sturdy chain as well as some support straps. Engine leveler helps. Make sure, and double-check, that EVERYTHING is disconnected, i.e. oil pressure, wires to distributor, etc.

Save the beer until after.

Good luck!

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I did this once and pulled the tranny & motor together. Used a 2 ton hoist with a load leveler. Had a few helpers. No drama. If I was alone I'd probably split them.
 
Hello: Since you are looking for a consensus here, none will be found:). It all depends on what you would like to do and have tools to do. I pulled only my engine, as I had already pulled my T-Case and tranny a few months earlier to rebuild them and put them back in. If I had not, I probably would have pulled them all together. As it was, pulling the engine was not that hard. Putting it back in , on the other hand, was an exercise in frustration when it came time to line up the trans input shaft with the pilot bearing. If you have a engine lift with the levelers, that part will go much easier. So with that said, the choice is yours of course. Try to have fun with it and be safe, it's heavy no matter which way you go.
 
A trick for aligning the engine to the transmission is to cut the heads off a the same size bolts that attach the trans to the bell housing. Screw them into the bell housing holes to act as guide pins. Works great.

Be sure to cut slot the bolt ends for easy removal with a screw driver. Replace with original bolts and good to go.

No right or wrong way to do this, what ever works for you.
 
If you are putting the engine/tranny combo directly into the other truck, then I would do it as one unit.
If you plan is to do other work that requires them to be split, then I would probably pull the motor/drop the tranny separate.
As has been said, whichever way you are most comfortable, and SAFE.
 
all together...take hood off and the core support brace...
 
Engine out. Did it as one piece. Very heavy and cumbersome. Took awhile as this was my first pull, but moved slow and stayed safe. Load leveler helped. Thanks for all the advice. Next: Do some cleaning up if the whole thing, replace intake gasket, put it into new donee. Looking at paint colors also for body, saw a tundra with a sandstone color. What do you guys think?
 
Now you should split it, replace clutch and rear main seal, there might be a few other things...
 
now you know what's involved, do whatever maintenance you can while the motor's out eg clutch, release bearing, welch plugs, flange gaskets, I get inside the empty engine bay with a buff and a few flap wheels and clean off as much rust & crud I can. Attention to chassis channels... I blast it out with plenty engine cleaner and a pressure washer - including spring leaves from the inside.. any engine bay bodywork..If there's engine work to be done - like rings, bearing, seals etc, i much prefer to do it with the engine out.. could even take the block/head in for machining if necessary.. get a micrometer and check the cam, crank journals, end float yourself, no substitute for your own hands.. valves ok?
 
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