a/c compressor - clutch - pulley removal

Joined
Jan 15, 2011
Messages
331
Location
san jose, ca
howdees all

just got done tackling my a/c compressor / clutch issues

here my $0.02 - hopefully can thusly help you out someday.

obviously actually replacing a/c compressor is a "big deal" - i did not DIY that - but rather pulled it "off" the block
and "inspected" / broke down the clutch / pulley assembly....

so to do so - you are (obviously going to need to) loosed the belt from the crank -
if you a super new.... such only requires removing the bottom skid plate and accessing the tightening pulley and pulley lock nut....
you want even more access take off the left side steering damper bracket but it is not needed....

then the a/c belt then comes off both the crank and a/c pulley -
from there - you can "test" the pulley bearing for noise / grinding and run out / wobble...(thats what i was looking for)

again obvious there are 2 a/c line (low and high) - you will need to unscrew the hard line brackets
to give you more flew (2 bolts - one against the fire wall)
there is nothing to unbolt from the low pressure line....

there is a small harness atop the compressor - that will need to be unplugged....

this is part 82221-60020 Oil pressure switch wire

indeed disconnect this from both the a/c and oil pressure sender (easily 2 clip off)
as well as from the connector by the washing fluid res.

now too would be a good time to remove you radiator overflow.

there are only 4 long bolts holding the a/c compressor to the block....(easy access)

so now with the a/c compressor free from the block - lines loosen - and the
oil pressure wire out of the way -

you will have a fair amount of room to swing the a/c compressor out
and address the clutch, snap ring, pulley, another snap ring, and finally magneto...

youtube any a/c clutch - they are all basically the same (eric the car guy has a good one)

i was able to get my small air gun to "zip" off the 10 mm bolt from the clutch.
tis always an issue on a loosening a free spinning nut and there are really any "hold fast"
places on the clutch to say wedge a screwdriver - guess there is always a strap wrenches or channel locks.

(side note - the clutch has a CRUCIAL washer - that basically sets the gaping
from the clutch and pulley - DONT LOOSE THIS - once you have the 10 mm nut free
gently remove the clutch and look for this washer - it may be inside the bore -
what ever the case may be - find it and keep it safe)


now the snap rings - just because of the confined space may be an issue....tis a tough angle
the pulley one was the "hardest" for me and the magento one was much easier....

the pulley might be "stuck" - but with some gentle tapping (small mallet and wood block)
it came off.

all in all tis :banana::banana: job - requiring no special tools (other than a snap ring pliers)
once "free" of the block - there is plenty of space to work.
you will easily be able to replace the enite clutch / magneto assembly or just the bearing -
without ever "breaking open" the a/c system.

for me - the whole assembly was fine - bearing smooth AF -
what was making the noise was the snap ring grove for the pulley had broken / sheered off....
so in effect my a/c compressor is "broke"

i repacked the pulley bearing and put everything back
(dont forget that oil pressure wire or you wont get any reading on your dash)

my a/c runs perfectly fine - but indeed (since there is no snap ring fxing my pulley)
when not engaged - from time to time i can hear it drag on the clutch.....

am debating if i want to do the full monty -
i can easily have any small time shop - suck out the refrigerant
and just replace the a/c compressor -

but it appears most recommend "doing" the whole thing new -
compressor - condenser, evap core, drier - etc.....
i heard the evap core was a major PITA to get to....

maybe ill wait till winter to do what i can and not have a a/c for 3 months
as i DIY what i can....

anyways - again hope this helps someone - someday.....


cheers....

bf
265k and still rolling....
 

Dissent

Questioning my life choices...
GOLD Star
Joined
Sep 27, 2012
Messages
3,906
Location
Loudon, TN
Nice work, that is a PITA but doable. I managed to do my pulley bearing without removing the compressor by just unbolting the compressor and manueuvering it upwards until I could access the pulley. Took about 2 hours in all. Looking at doing the same bearing on the wife's RX300 and that sucker is buried deep. One of the lines looks to be in front of a mounting bolt. Probably have to pop the block off hers and evac/recharge with a new dryer.

Not sure what year you have. Mine's a 97. I've actually replaced everything BUT the compressor on my LX. The evap core is actually quite easy, just a hand full of screws holding it on after you remove the glove box and the junction block on the firewall. Took me about 15 min to get it out, another 30 to disassemble, clean and take pics, and about another 15 to get it back in. I replaced the expansion valve while I was in there and cleaned out the debris in the housing. Just take your time with it, it's super easy. I also replaced my condenser with a parallel flow unit (HUGE IMPROVEMENT in Phoenix heat). The dryer was pretty easy too. May want to relocate the dryer behind the battery like the 91-94's have but you'll have to source/fab an adapter due to the different sizes of the R-134 vs. R-12 hard lines. Replace all your o-rings while you're in there too. Lastly, there's a pressure switch behind the battery (on the 95-97s) that should be swapped to a 3-terminal unit (replacing the 2-terminal) unit to enable adding a pressure-regulated turn on/off signal for a cooling fan relay.

I bought a vacuum pump, scale, a set of gauges, o-ring set, Nylog Thread Sealant (a must) and a big bottle of R-134 from Amazon and did it myself about 2 years ago. Was a solid :banana::banana: job when looking back. Doing a static dump of the Freon was easy than guessing about (errr..reading) the gauges. I just put it on the scale, opened the valve and dumped in the set value in the FSM (can't recall how many lbs off the top of my head) and it's ice cold.
 

flintknapper

SILVER Star
Joined
May 22, 2004
Messages
10,537
Location
Deep East Texas
Not sure what year you have. Mine's a 97. I've actually replaced everything BUT the compressor on my LX. The evap core is actually quite easy, just a hand full of screws holding it on after you remove the glove box and the junction block on the firewall. Took me about 15 min to get it out, another 30 to disassemble, clean and take pics, and about another 15 to get it back in. I replaced the expansion valve while I was in there and cleaned out the debris in the housing. Just take your time with it, it's super easy. I also replaced my condenser with a parallel flow unit (HUGE IMPROVEMENT in Phoenix heat). The dryer was pretty easy too. May want to relocate the dryer behind the battery like the 91-94's have but you'll have to source/fab an adapter due to the different sizes of the R-134 vs. R-12 hard lines. Replace all your o-rings while you're in there too. Lastly, there's a pressure switch behind the battery (on the 95-97s) that should be swapped to a 3-terminal unit (replacing the 2-terminal) unit to enable adding a pressure-regulated turn on/off signal for a cooling fan relay.

I bought a vacuum pump, scale, a set of gauges, o-ring set, Nylog Thread Sealant (a must) and a big bottle of R-134 from Amazon and did it myself about 2 years ago. Was a solid :banana::banana: job when looking back. Doing a static dump of the Freon was easy than guessing about (errr..reading) the gauges. I just put it on the scale, opened the valve and dumped in the set value in the FSM (can't recall how many lbs off the top of my head) and it's ice cold.

👍 👍


R134a capacity.jpg
 

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