97-97 brakes and rotors and lines and LSPV

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i'm thinking to have a shop do brake lines and rotors and pads partly because i am slammed but also because i don't want to deal with bleeding lines.
anyway i bought this set of four pads with some other parts i needed. i thought the guy said they were oversized for the fronts.
can i buy oversized pads did the rears? i assume they will fit. do i need to tell the shop anything specific?
is it worthwhile buying some upgraded rotors as long as this work is being done?
my thought right now is if i have to spend "extra" money on this rig it would be on rotors and also on new (clearer) headlight lenses (and bulbs).
also, do i tell them to adjust the LSPV per FSM ans if they look at me with a blank stare or say they don't do it or it never needs adjustment or something i go to another shop or what please?
i'm also going to search for a brake pad and lines installation thread so if anyone knows of a good one i would take it. or a recommendation for a high quality brake bleeder as i may try to learn to do this over a weekend if i can get clear i guess...
THANKS

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flintknapper

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i'm thinking to have a shop do brake lines and rotors and pads partly because i am slammed but also because i don't want to deal with bleeding lines.
Bleeding the system can be a chore at times. Successfully bleeding the ABS system and LSPV whether doing it yourself or a shop does it.
anyway i bought this set of four pads with some other parts i needed. i thought the guy said they were oversized for the fronts.
can i buy oversized pads did the rears? i assume they will fit. do i need to tell the shop anything specific?
No oversize pads for rear. The fronts you show are for a 100 series and they will fit your 80 series (leave out the anti squeal shims). The are larger but only (taller and thicker). General real world experience shows they are no more effective in terms of stopping power but they do last longer. I run them on mine, many folks stay with the 80 series version.
is it worthwhile buying some upgraded rotors as long as this work is being done?
IMO no. Any good quality (or OEM) rotor will be fine unless you plan to race your Land Cruiser. A properly working 80 series brake SYSTEM is more than adequate. You can choose more aggressive pads if you wish and see some performance gains, but it comes at a cost to the rotors.
my thought right now is if i have to spend "extra" money on this rig it would be on rotors and also on new (clearer) headlight lenses (and bulbs).
No to the rotors....BIG YES to upgrading the headlights. There are many ways to do it.
also, do i tell them to adjust the LSPV per FSM ans if they look at me with a blank stare or say they don't do it or it never needs adjustment or something i go to another shop or what please?
The LSPV if working properly doesn't have an adjustment Per Se. It simply applies/allows more rear braking as weight is added to the back of the vehicle. Some folks remove/bypass this item altogether.
i'm also going to search for a brake pad and lines installation thread so if anyone knows of a good one i would take it. or a recommendation for a high quality brake bleeder as i may try to learn to do this over a weekend if i can get clear i guess...
THANKS
It is always good learn to new skills. I encourage that. I would caution that working on a vital system like your brakes be carefully thought out first however. It can be a frustrating and expensive learning experience.
 

Road Apple

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If the pads are oversized, then they are not going to fit in your calipers. Calipers take a specific shape of pad. Deviate from that, and they will not fit (though they can be a bit thicker). If those pads are for your application, then they're the correct shape. Seller was blowing hot air up your and his own butt. Advics is a good brand. They're the OEM supplier on a lot of Japanese cars.

As for rotors, I always replace rotors with pads. Reusing (aka a pad slap) or resurfacing your old rotors makes noise and warping more likely. I bought a brake lathe to give a more budget brake option for my customers. I only had it a few years and got rid of it. I found an increase in comebacks using it (even properly cross hatching the rotors afterwards). You get new quality rotors and pads, and you pay to have them properly bedded in, or you can go somewhere else. My comebacks are practically zero.

As for which rotors, stay away from the cheap parts stores rotors. Try and find a rotor with high carbon steel.. They're quieter and more resilient to high heat. You don't need cross drilled rotors. They won't benefit 99% of street cars. In fact, they're detrimental, as the holes remove rotor mass, and mass is what absorbs heat. There is one nice thing about them on street cars, however. If you've ever hit water and had to hit your brakes, you've had that "oh s***" moment where you have no brakes. The holes help evacuate the water from between your rotor and pad and get your brakes back quicker. A good decently priced rotor is Bosch. I actually run them on my endurance race car (hours of hard braking) with good results, and they're not cross drilled or anything.

I don't see much need to adjust your rear load sensing valve if your suspension geometry hasn't changed and there's no damage to the mechanism. If you're not seeing a problem with excessive nose dive or your rear brakes locking up early it's working fine. Truth is, most shops don't have the gauges necessary or experience with them to do it.
 

jellis

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Brake line replacement is a good idea. I figured out mine needed replaced when I couldn't bleed much out of the rear right caliper. This also showed up on the pressure gauge when screwing with my LSPV (I have a lift and wanted to double check the PO had set it up properly) as a much lower pressure at that caliper, about half the rear left if I remember. I got my SS lines from Cruiser Outfitters.

I just use a Mightvac to get it started, then for serious flushing have my wife help for a few minutes on the brake pedal.
 
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Bleeding the system can be a chore at times. Successfully bleeding the ABS system and LSPV whether doing it yourself or a shop does it.

No oversize pads for rear. The fronts you show are for a 100 series and they will fit your 80 series (leave out the anti squeal shims). The are larger but only (taller and thicker). General real world experience shows they are no more effective in terms of stopping power but they do last longer. I run them on mine, many folks stay with the 80 series version.

IMO no. Any good quality (or OEM) rotor will be fine unless you plan to race your Land Cruiser. A properly working 80 series brake SYSTEM is more than adequate. You can choose more aggressive pads if you wish and see some performance gains, but it comes at a cost to the rotors.

No to the rotors....BIG YES to upgrading the headlights. There are many ways to do it.

The LSPV if working properly doesn't have an adjustment Per Se. It simply applies/allows more rear braking as weight is added to the back of the vehicle. Some folks remove/bypass this item altogether.

It is always good learn to new skills. I encourage that. I would caution that working on a vital system like your brakes be carefully thought out first however. It can be a frustrating and expensive learning experience.
Listen to him.

The best brake bleeder on the market for 80s is the Motive:
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although the adapter is dodgy, it works if you pay attention. You just need three hands. Not necessary, but helpful is the CCTools BA-10 adaptor:
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I have both, and I would gratefully pay someone to bleed my 80s brakes without them.
 
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Installing new brake lines is a good idea, but not absolutely necessary. It's more important to replace the fluid regularly, because it picks up contamination from the lines, no matter how old they are. Just like engine oil, it should be replaced when contaminated, not when the calendar says to do it. A testing kit is invaluable:

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The flexible lines are another matter. Replace them as and when your budget allows. I replaced the keeper springs and fittings when I replaced the hoses. They are old too.
 
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If the pads are oversized, then they are not going to fit in your calipers. Calipers take a specific shape of pad. Deviate from that, and they will not fit (though they can be a bit thicker). If those pads are for your application, then they're the correct shape. Seller was blowing hot air up your and his own butt. Advics is a good brand. They're the OEM supplier on a lot of Japanese cars.

As for rotors, I always replace rotors with pads. Reusing (aka a pad slap) or resurfacing your old rotors makes noise and warping more likely. I bought a brake lathe to give a more budget brake option for my customers. I only had it a few years and got rid of it. I found an increase in comebacks using it (even properly cross hatching the rotors afterwards). You get new quality rotors and pads, and you pay to have them properly bedded in, or you can go somewhere else. My comebacks are practically zero.

As for which rotors, stay away from the cheap parts stores rotors. Try and find a rotor with high carbon steel.. They're quieter and more resilient to high heat. You don't need cross drilled rotors. They won't benefit 99% of street cars. In fact, they're detrimental, as the holes remove rotor mass, and mass is what absorbs heat. There is one nice thing about them on street cars, however. If you've ever hit water and had to hit your brakes, you've had that "oh s***" moment where you have no brakes. The holes help evacuate the water from between your rotor and pad and get your brakes back quicker. A good decently priced rotor is Bosch. I actually run them on my endurance race car (hours of hard braking) with good results, and they're not cross drilled or anything.

I don't see much need to adjust your rear load sensing valve if your suspension geometry hasn't changed and there's no damage to the mechanism. If you're not seeing a problem with excessive nose dive or your rear brakes locking up early it's working fine. Truth is, most shops don't have the gauges necessary or experience with them to do it.

The 100 series land cruiser pads are bigger ie more surface area and they do fit the 80 series caliper. I ran them for a while, didn’t notice any significant benefit.
 
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The 100 series land cruiser pads are bigger ie more surface area and they do fit the 80 series caliper. I ran them for a while, didn’t notice any significant benefit.
Well if the pad backing plate is the same shape, and Toyota was able to squeeze more material on it, then more surface area is always better. That's a good bit of info.
 

flintknapper

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Well if the pad backing plate is the same shape, and Toyota was able to squeeze more material on it, then more surface area is always better. That's a good bit of info.

The 100 series pad is mostly just taller. In fact... it overhangs the outside edge of the rotor slightly. The amount of extra surface area is insignificant. The one advantage it has however is that they last longer for most folks (they are thicker). In my case (owning both an 80 series and 100 series) I only have to keep one set of pads on hand in my shop. So that is nice too.

Brake Pads Front.jpg
 
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flintknapper

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Once again, @flintknapper shows the definitive Landcruiser photo library.

I can't help it. I'm a 'visual' learner with a strong Neanderthal heritage I think. Concepts alone often allude me, so I have to SEE it...even when just explaining something. It's more for my own benefit than the readership here. :)
 
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I can't help it. I'm a 'visual' learner with a strong Neanderthal heritage I think. Concepts alone often allude me, so I have to SEE it...even when just explaining something. It's more for my own benefit than the readership here. :)
Mutual admiration society going on here. I'm just jealous 'cause my library isn't as complete as yours.
 
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@landcruiser3DP you only adjust the LSPV if you've installed a lift. Or removed one.
thanks man. does it self adjust once you add a lift? or do you just need to get in and measure that dimension (which is sort of oddly drawn in the FSM for some reason)? i mean you just are supposed to verify a center of bolt to center of bolt dimension is correct then? or are you actually supposed to adjust something if you add a lift?
 
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Brake line replacement is a good idea. I figured out mine needed replaced when I couldn't bleed much out of the rear right caliper. This also showed up on the pressure gauge when screwing with my LSPV (I have a lift and wanted to double check the PO had set it up properly) as a much lower pressure at that caliper, about half the rear left if I remember. I got my SS lines from Cruiser Outfitters.

I just use a Mightvac to get it started, then for serious flushing have my wife help for a few minutes on the brake pedal.
there is a special brake line pressure gauge or something? and you need to adjust the LSPV so you get the correct values from the FSM at the various locations in the LSPV is that right?
 
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I would recommend new booster, master, lspv, and new hoses. Hard lines should be fine.
so no new rotors but if i buy a new master cylinder snd a new brake booster i can have them put it in at the same time?
can i buy parts or a kit or something and rebuild the ones that came out if i put in new ones? not totally sure what i would do with rebuilt ones yet but i find putting in new snd refurbing old saves time and it's a good way to get your head around things?
 
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so no new rotors but if i buy a new master cylinder snd a new brake booster i can have them put it in at the same time?
can i buy parts or a kit or something and rebuild the ones that came out if i put in new ones? not totally sure what i would do with rebuilt ones yet but i find putting in new snd refurbing old saves time and it's a good way to get your head around things?
Yes they can and should do it at the same time. I don't know of any way to rebuild the master or booster easily. Check out this website for brake parts he is a mud member: Land Cruiser 80 Series - https://www.cityracerllc.com/collections/land-cruiser-80-series
 

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