91 FJ80 Steering Cover Question (1 Viewer)

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I have tried to not ask questions before I search for myself in my parts sourcing as to not re ask questions so if this is covered elsewhere please know I have spent some time searching. I have not been able to identify if there are any boots or covers for the openings in the steering cover from diagrams or photos. I find it hard to believe these would remain open to collect dust though. The cover was very easy to find PN 45286-60953-CO, I haven't ordered it yet as it is part of my interior parts wallet flushing order. Fingers crossed, if these exist they are not NLA.
cover.jpg
 
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I have tried to not ask questions before I search for myself in my parts sourcing as to not re ask questions so if this is covered elsewhere please know I have spent some time searching. I have not been able to identify if there are any boots or covers for the openings in the steering cover from diagrams or photos. I find it hard to believe these would remain open to collect dust though. The cover was very easy to find PN 45286-60953-CO, I haven't ordered it yet as it is part of my interior parts wallet flushing order. Fingers crossed, if these exist they are not NLA.
View attachment 2821283
No boots or anything. Just the upper and lower clashes.
 
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Thanks for the info. It’s funny to me the same group that designed a proportioning valve that limits pressure to the rear while at full droop didn’t cover these dust buckets. I suppose they had their priorities right.

I’m going to have to come up with something there or it will bug me every time I get behind the wheel
 

OGBeno

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Thanks for the info. It’s funny to me the same group that designed a proportioning valve that limits pressure to the rear while at full droop didn’t cover these dust buckets. I suppose they had their priorities right.

I’m going to have to come up with something there or it will bug me every time I get behind the wheel

The same group did not design either.

There were well over a 1000 engineers from well over 6 different Toyota Group companies tasked with the design and development of the 80 series starting in roughly 1987.
 
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Good to see your input, I was hoping your post was going to be along the lines of "actually there is this obscure part, PN# xxxxx".

Perhaps group can be understood multiple ways. In most engineering fields, project mangers coordinate between the separate disciplines and make up the collective design group. While I cannot speak for how Toyota managed the process for the 80s due to lack of personal experience, companies I have worked for have project mangers and heads of engineering departments that are responsible for integration to avoid "designing in a bubble" situations especially when there are multiple firms who all rely on each others work product. It was from that experience I referenced a group because we were always referred to as the engineering group, and the design folks, the design group and so on.
 

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Product Planning and implementation looked like this roughly the mid-1980’s through the mid-2010’s at TMC:

2444ED59-51BC-43B6-A152-769244061AD2.jpeg


The 80 series was a result of this matrix organization. TMC was one of the first to implement matrix organizational logic.

What the schematic above does not show is supplier involvement in design and final
product delivery. For example ARACO, as an outsourced final assembler, has way more say in initial design and development than any assembler for a US domestic manufacturer.

Toyota developed the “black box” theory of supplier development and integration: the trust developed over decades of personnel integration between the two companies allowed Toyota to fully “trust” the input of the supplier and the work the supplier provided…. Generally unquestioned by the mothership….

The other things missing here is the importance of the Chief Engineer: “shusa” a very powerful form of CE that Toyota cultivated.

They were the pimp daddies.

These are your LC pimp daddies:

EF232091-EB08-40BD-A696-AA466457E770.jpeg


Takeo Kondo was the CE of the 80 series. He has a pretty legendary role in general LC development from about 1985-2001.
 
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And to think all of the various Toyota companies/subsidiaries grew from an automatic loom company and Sakichi pimp daddy Toyoda and his business model from the loom works.

What the diagram of Centers I,II and III does not show is the below rendering of the signs affixed above each center heads desk.

1606822998-keepkaizen.jpg
 

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