2000 miles of back roads in a 55-year old FJ40 (1 Viewer)

rkymtnflyfisher

Big Government Sucks
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Nothing wrong with good paper maps except it's become harder to find them.
Agree 100%

I found a good stash of maps at a local office supply store here, they have had most of what I've needed for the last couple trips in the backcountry.

Had to go to USGS webstore for some others.
 
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Agree 100%

I found a good stash of maps at a local office supply store here, they have had most of what I've needed for the last couple trips in the backcountry.

Had to go to USGS webstore for some others.
The USGS has done a great job making their maps available. The USFS and BLM are still available from local offices, and those are good as they usually depict roads that actually have legal right-of-ways. I also have gazetteers, but don’t trust them for unimproved roads. I usually check out Google Earth to verify that the smaller roads actually exist.

Back to the Land Cruiser, I did get the chance to crawl under it and inspect under the hood. It is not ready. Working on a list of needed repairs and upgrades, will update, have a good night.
 
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I did a thing today. I installed the rollbar that came with the truck when I purchased it a few years back. It’s ugly as get-up, but it is fairly stout and the bolt holes are already in the truck-question for everyone-would y’all keep it if you were doing a long road trip?
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I did a thing today. I installed the rollbar that came with the truck when I purchased it a few years back. It’s ugly as get-up, but it is fairly stout and the bolt holes are already in the truck-question for everyone-would y’all keep it if you were doing a long road trip?View attachment 2601465
I don't know much about roll bars, but I'm a paper map nut. In oregon if you go to each Forest Service area and get the fire map you will get all the roads, small included. Even roads that are very small and have berms that supposedly close them (often the berms have been gone around). The only thing I have found is that you will have to go to each fire area as the Forest Service offices will not carry anything else but their area. I love driving back roads in Eastern Oregon. I also use the fire maps for hunting.

Don
 

brooklyn

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I believe you mentioned going topless in an earlier post - the roll bar may give something to tie a tarp onto if you get hit with rain along the way. Plus you can tie stuff to it if necessary. Can’t really see a downside.
 
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Ok, good points on the rollbar. Don’t particularly like it, but wIll keep it and try to attach a bikini top to give some protection from the sun and rain. As a bonus I think I can figure out a way to secure a large, lockable toolbox I had from another project and a hi-lift to it (rather than drilling holes in vintage sheet metal)
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After sending off the 800 page report that no one will read, I was able to spend the better part of the day wrenching on the truck getting it ready for the upcoming road trip-whatever that might be.
Fixing the brakes was on top of the list. This should be straightforward, but like anything on an older, modified truck, wasn’t as easy as it should have been. I’m running a Corvette, dual reservoir master cylinder and front discs, with new lines everywhere except the factory lines atop the rear axle. This thing should stop well, but the brakes have been mushy since I’ve got it back on the road 4-5 years ago. It was only after replacing the wheel cylinders for the second time that I noticed the flare was badly cracked where it connects to the wheel cylinder (I feel bad because I was cursing certain countries that produce poor quality auto parts and whatnot).
Anyhow, it was my own lack of attention to detail all along. Strange that the leak was so small that it barely leaked any fluid ( the reservoir would get low about every six months), but the leak itself was so small that it wasn’t noticeable, yet enough air got in to make the brakes mushy. Now the truck has good, if not great, brakes for the trip. Onto the next problem!
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Thanks for sharing your plans. I'm in Oregon as well but clear over on the eastern side of the state. Keep us posted. I'd love to join you for a day or two of your trip if you want tag alongs. My cruiser could use a tune up and an oil change but for the most part is ready to go.
 
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Thanks for sharing your plans. I'm in Oregon as well but clear over on the eastern side of the state. Keep us posted. I'd love to join you for a day or two of your trip if you want tag alongs. My cruiser could use a tune up and an oil change but for the most part is ready to go.
I’ll keep that in mind, one option I am considering is to go through eastern Oregon/Owyhee/Silver City area-looking over maps looks like there is some interesting country out there that I haven’t seen
 
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Ya. It's pretty cool out there. And if you haven't done it before, Steens mountain is way cool. And the Alvord desert on east side of it.

As for what to take along. I keep it pretty simple as well. Try as much as possible to make sure everything is in good working order, bring along an extra fan belt and some extra oil and anti-freeze, and a small but inclusive tool assortment including some wiring stuff and hit the road. I'm not an great mechanic by any stretch but I've always figured out a way to make it home or close to it. Sometimes with the help of others. And it's never been me or my rig that kept us from finishing a trip even though it's 40+ years old.
 
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Staying consistent with the theme of fixing little things that don’t really matter while ignoring the larger issues with FJ40 that might actually cause breakdowns, today I tackled a few easy fixes. First I figured out a way to keep the tool box from sliding around without drilling holes in the body by using a piece of flat steel attached to the rollcage with u-bolts. Would it hold the 150 pound box in a rollover at highway speeds? Probably not, but if you roll one of these things at speed, it probably won’t end well anyway you look at it.
The second fix was to replace the spare tire latch with one I scored this morning for free. For years I’ve had the latch held shut with bailing wire to keep it from rattling and coming open. This morning I picked up a Bestop with soft doors and hardware for $200, and the owner threw in a spare tire carrier for free, so good deal.
The third thing was to fix the exhaust as it exited behind the bumper, causing the diesel soot to escape along the body. Easy fix. All in all a good day-but at some point I will need to address the real issues with the rig, such as the oil leaks, substandard transmission mount and wiring. And then, of course, to figure out where the summers’ road trip will be to.

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samatulich

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Just curious if you know where the oil leaks are coming from? I drove several thousand miles, well aware of oil leaks and consumption. I’m vigilant about checking every morning when I’m driving hours, upon hours each day. I’ve spent the last few months trying to address oil leaks.
I am enjoying this thread too. Kind of envious, would like to take on another road trip of the sorts.
 

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