What is the proper procedure to install a torque converter into an FJ62

Discussion in '60-Series Wagons' started by themarquis78, Aug 12, 2010.

  1. themarquis78

    themarquis78

    Messages:
    46
    Location:
    Sandy, Utah
    So I own a Toyota FSM and it has exactly ZERO info on how to get the Torque Converter installed after pulling the tranny. We already pulled the transmission to get the pump fixed after screwing up the motor drop-in after getting it rebuilt. Pump and everything else is fixed and after mating the tranny up to the bell housing we can get the drive plate to move but not the TC.

    How do you get the holes in the drive plate and mounts on the TC to match up to screw in the TC? I'm seriously at a loss for how much extra time and $$ this dang TC has cost me and it looks like we're going to have to drop the tranny (again) to get it right.

    How do you get the stupid thing in?

    Help me Obi-Wan Kenobi...you're my only hope.
  2. KLF

    KLF Frame waxer

    Messages:
    5,530
    Location:
    Southern NH
    It's been about 5 years since I've done one, but I believe I used an M8 stud in one of the TC holes, I stabbed it into one of the flexplate holes as I was mating things together. There's a little "window" in the cover plate that hangs below the engine, you take that off so you can access the 6 bolts. Once you get the stud in, I turned the engine with a wrench on the crank, put the other 5 bolts in. Then you pull the stud out and put the last bolt in.

    Something like that. It's in the FSM, maybe you don't have the specific one for the A440.
  3. themarquis78

    themarquis78

    Messages:
    46
    Location:
    Sandy, Utah
    It's not like a Chilton manual or something that's for pickups, 4Runners, and Land Cruiser. It's specific to my year and everything. I'm incredibly surprised there is nothing in there.

    So studding one of the holes is the only way to do it huh? I've heard of people doing that before but it sounds like it'd be easy to screw up and have to re-pull the tranny. I can imagine it's a nightmare to try and line up the stud and little hole in the drive plate all while trying to mate up the tranny.
  4. Dynosoar

    Dynosoar Slightly Disturbed SILVER Star

    Messages:
    3,140
    Location:
    SoCal
    I have NEVER done this with an A440. However with a GM auto trans (th400 and 700r4 - the two I have worked with) the TC should turn when installed on the the trans. I can't imagine the TC on the the A440 would be "locked" in place, after all it has to spin with the engine.

    Dynosoar:zilla:
  5. overhanger

    overhanger

    Messages:
    977
    I have removed and replaced the A440F and torque converter and the method described by KLF worked fine for me. As Dynosaur says, the TC rotated just fine when in place on the input shaft.
  6. astr

    astr

    Messages:
    774
    Location:
    Michigan/Costa Rica
    The TC should rotate easily relative to the flex plate. Are you sure that the TC is fully seated in the transmission? There are three items that need to engage when you install the TC into the transmission: the notches that engage the pump, and the two sets of splines. Usually, the splines are easy - the pump drive notches are a bit more difficult. If the notches are not engaged properly into the pump, the TC will stick out about 1/2" too far. If you use the transmission bolts to pull the transmission up to the engine, you will be forcing the TC into the pump and it will bind and can damage the T/C and/or pump.

    The way I install a TC into the transmission (with the transmission out of the truck) is to position the transmission with the front pointing up. I then slide the TC in over the shaft while rotating the TC. Once the splines have engaged, I will lift the TC a bit and rotate it a few degrees and then set it back down on the transmission shaft. I repeat this proceedure until the TC drops down that last 1/2". It is very obvious when that happens. Rotating the TC without lifting it causes the pump to rotate with it and you'll never get the notches to line up.

    Good luck!

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