1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

U-joint, yoke repair

Discussion in '80-Series Tech' started by landtoy80, Jul 31, 2003.

  1. landtoy80

    landtoy80

    Messages:
    5,668
    Likes Received:
    241
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2003
    Location:
    North Front Range, CO
    Has anyone replaced the u-joints on their 80? I had a bear of a time getting them off and even worse time installing them. On one I had to grind down the c-clip to get it in and now that cap doesn't let grease pass by like the ohters do when greasing.
    The problem is the hole in the yoke where the cap goes is messed up. I was thinking of getting a hone and clean up the hole so the cap will slide in without the use of a sledg hammer.
    Any reason why I shouldn't do this?
    kurt
     
  2. landtoy80

    landtoy80

    Messages:
    5,668
    Likes Received:
    241
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2003
    Location:
    North Front Range, CO
    I found a used yoke,u-joint and flange for $40. I could of got the whole driveshaft for $100. Shipping will be alot cheaper for the yoke.
    kurt
     
  3. AZcruiser

    AZcruiser

    Messages:
    332
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2003
    Location:
    phoenix
    Kurt,

    Are you repairing because a problem with clunking and/or play in the drive shaft?

    chris
    94 LC
     
  4. landtoy80

    landtoy80

    Messages:
    5,668
    Likes Received:
    241
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2003
    Location:
    North Front Range, CO
    When I replace the U-joints they didn't come out straight and dinged up the hole where the cap for the u-joint goes. They had 200+k mi and didn't need replacing but I did it as preventive maintenance.
    kurt

    Am I the only one on this list that has replaced 80 u-joints? :-\
     
  5. landtank

    landtank SILVER Star

    Messages:
    18,423
    Likes Received:
    596
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2003
    Location:
    Groveland MA
  6. landtoy80

    landtoy80

    Messages:
    5,668
    Likes Received:
    241
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2003
    Location:
    North Front Range, CO
    Did you have to use a sledg and a torch to get them off?
    kurt
     
  7. landtank

    landtank SILVER Star

    Messages:
    18,423
    Likes Received:
    596
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2003
    Location:
    Groveland MA
    I replaced the whole shaft ::). there was some play in the slip yoke as well as the front joint so the shaft was easier. I'm not sure if in my situation I could have gotten by on just a yoke. In the past on other LCs I've used a large steel c-clamp to push out the old u-joint and then press in the new one.
     
  8. landtoy80

    landtoy80

    Messages:
    5,668
    Likes Received:
    241
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2003
    Location:
    North Front Range, CO
    Got my used yoke and a center floor mat today. There is old grease on the u-joint so it looks to be well maintained. Will install next week. How much grease should I put in the yoke after I install?
    I put the yoke on the shaft last time and pumped grease till it stopped at the flange. Does this sound right?
    kurt
    I give Cruiser Parts.net a + so far.
     
  9. landtank

    landtank SILVER Star

    Messages:
    18,423
    Likes Received:
    596
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2003
    Location:
    Groveland MA
    People will jump on me for this but, I pump grease until the shaft expands about 1/4". This is on both front and rear. I know 80s cool list will say this will produce vibrations but I feel that is do to the poor pinion bearing selection from toyota. You fill the shaft from the high side(transfer case) so I slightly over fill to force grease up the shaft and out the dust cover. Only way I know of guarenteeing to grease the yoke. I do get an oder from the grease burning on the muffler ::).
     
  10. IdahoDoug

    IdahoDoug

    Messages:
    8,801
    Likes Received:
    92
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2003
    Rick,

    Overgreasing the slip yokes will not cause vibration. But if you persist, one day you will be unlucky and hit a bump leaving the spot where you greased it and crack the wall of the center diffy. You're basically turning the shaft into a hydraulic ram, and when 2000lbs of 80 rear end comes down on it expecting it to shorten (plus the leverage ratio of the angled shaft), there's going to be a force spike measured in several tons. Take my advice, cease doing this. I pump enough times by hand so that the shaft *begins* to move. Then I let the truck sit for a while to let the grease squeeze down the shaft before moving it. I also get the smell of grease on the exhaust letting me know the grease quantity is sufficient to lube the splines all the way to the ends.

    IdahoDoug
     
  11. scottm

    scottm

    Messages:
    3,140
    Media:
    8
    Likes Received:
    847
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2003
    Location:
    Third Coast, USA
    I've been giving it 3 pumps every 5k, how much can it need? Does that sound adequate? I've stopped hauling a trailer through construction sites, it only flexes for speed bumps now :-\
     
  12. landtank

    landtank SILVER Star

    Messages:
    18,423
    Likes Received:
    596
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2003
    Location:
    Groveland MA
    Potato Doug,
    I think we're doing pretty much the same aren't we?. You pump until it begins to move so what's this 1/8"? Wouldn't you get the same effect when hitting a bump as I do, both tubes are full of grease. As I see it the grease needs to be forced or better coaxed up the yoke by putting in just a little more so on those first drives it can wiggle it's way up the shaft and out the dust cap. I'll make a point of dropping it back though.
     
  13. IdahoDoug

    IdahoDoug

    Messages:
    8,801
    Likes Received:
    92
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2003
    Hey, easy on the 'tater jokes or I'll start in on the state that brought us Dukakis! :D I agree with you there's not much difference in each of our fill strategies, though lifting the rear end by hydraulic pressure on the side of the diff casing is a bad thing I avoid. I try not to do that, and the first sign of movement indicates load is being applied. Really, the better part of my advice relates to what you do after you fill the splines. Drive gently to allow the grease to get into the splines without placing a high load on things. I suspect the moving shaft would aid this.

    Some day, I'm going to pull the shaft and see what's causing the restriction. Some say accumulated dried grease, but I'm the only one that's touched it and have used synthetics. I suspect it's simply tight tolerances.

    IdahoDoug
     
  14. thelal

    thelal

    Messages:
    539
    Likes Received:
    22
    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2003
    Location:
    was N of Seattle, WA, USA - now on 1 year 4x4 trip
    I've replaced 3 of my u-joints.
    Each time was a PITA.

    Had to use hammers (sorry Robbie!) and prev. cups to bang out from one side to another. It sometimes helps to PB Blaster the yoke (while truck sitting) or better if u have the shaft out. Doing that several times seems to help.
    Some people have reported success using a vice to help press the sides out.
    I also use a block of wood with a hole drilling to the exist dimensions of the cup so I can place the yoke down on it and bang away to my hearts content.

    I think I may need to get my shafts checked for balance as still have a little give on other (last of 4!) yoke!

    Lal
    90K on FZJ96 in CO
     
  15. landtoy80

    landtoy80

    Messages:
    5,668
    Likes Received:
    241
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2003
    Location:
    North Front Range, CO
    [ I've replaced 3 of my u-joints.
    Each time was a PITA.]

    Thats an understatment ;) I had to cut them out with a torch and when the torch was around I put the metal cutting blade on the Skill saw and cut them out. Getting them in was even worse :-[ I don't think I will do it again.Of all the things I have done to the 80 the u-joints were the worst :flipoff2:
    kurt
     
  16. Photoman

    Photoman SILVER Star

    Messages:
    1,145
    Media:
    41
    Likes Received:
    47
    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2003
    Kurt,
    I won’t go through the whole u-joint replacement procedure/sequence as you are probably familiar with it and it would take a long post. Please don’t think I’m talking down to you but would like to point out a few things. I have found it is best to have a press or know someone that does to do the U-joints (I have a 50 ton). That said I have done them with a vise and by the hammer method many many times. (Sometimes a vise won't work as it generates only so much pressure) The key is to support the yoke around the cup. To do this I find a socket that fits the yoke yet is large enough for the cup to be pressed or hammered into. As far as the C-clip not fitting, if too much grease got into the bottom of one or both cups, that will change the width of the u-joint and it will be hard or impossible to get the clips back in. It is OK to hone the yoke if care is taken not to increase the cup hole size. If the clip groove gets screwed up that can be a tough one without a mill.
    Bill
     
  17. cruiserdan

    cruiserdan SupportingVendor Emeritus Supporting Vendor Moderator

    Messages:
    20,603
    Likes Received:
    2,981
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2003
    Location:
    Surrounded by Cruisers from all over the world
    Bill is spot on.

    Hammering stresses the hell out of the components that need to be re-used. A press or a big vise or one of those big c-clamp looking tools designed to press u-jounts is a must to do the job properly and relatively painlessly. The pound-and-pray method should be reserved for emergency trail repairs.

    Dan.