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Shop question about 220v outlets

Discussion in 'Workshop and Home Improvement' started by Timoss, Jan 11, 2007.

  1. Timoss

    Timoss Regular Member

    Messages:
    230
    I have a 30 amp 110/220 outlet for a dryer in my basement. Can I plug 220v tools--like table saws and air compressors--into that (provided I make an adapter cord so it can fit the outlet)? Or do I need a dedicated 220v outlet?

    Timoss
    88 fj62 TLCA
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2007
  2. Okie_dave

    Okie_dave SILVER Star

    Messages:
    685
    Location:
    Tulsa, OK
    You can if the tools is rated less than 30 amps and the dryer is not running at the same time.
  3. Timoss

    Timoss Regular Member

    Messages:
    230
    So the fact that the dryer outlet is dual voltage 110/220 does not matter? I know very little about these things...

    Timoss
    88 fj62 TLCA
  4. LandCruiserPhil

    LandCruiserPhil New Member

    Messages:
    10,967
    Location:
    Scottsdale Arizona
    220V is just 2 - 110V line 180* out of phase.
    So the answer to your question is no.
  5. spressomon

    spressomon glutton

    Messages:
    10,779
    Location:
    Central Coast

    Your dryer, based upon your description, can operate on either 110V or 220V...however the wiring needs to be changed within the dryer depending whether you are feeding it 110V or 220V (check the owner's manual and/or the rear inside/outside panel of the dryer for instructions).

    Your 220V outlet, I think by code, has to be dedicated and not shared. You can run any appliance/tool that you want as long as it is designed/rated for 220V/30A power. If your device needs 220V/50A power then they are not compatible.
  6. Arya Ebrahimi

    Arya Ebrahimi SILVER Star

    Messages:
    3,102
    Location:
    Rockville, MD
    Technically you can't run them since the outlets are different according to amperage ratings.

    However, my 220V stick welder's amp rating is far greater than the plug I have it plugged into. Why? I never come close to using my welder to it's full potential. If I exceed the circuit's capacity, the breaker simply trips. For home/hobby use, I don't see what the big deal is.

    Ary
  7. Landpimp

    Landpimp New Member

    Messages:
    12,956
    Location:
    PNW
    I run my 220v welder off my home dryer 220v 50amp plug and it works perfect

    maybe Crusty TLC or Ziltch can chime in......:D
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2007
  8. Mace

    Mace rock scientist.. Staff Member s-Moderator

    Messages:
    17,858
    Location:
    Las Vegas
    so is the power to your dryer 220 or 110??

    What's the plug look like?

    table saws and aircompressors are low amp draw tools.. welders are higher (depending on the welder)

    My 220 compressor is 30 amp
    my plasma cutter is 30 amp
    My welder is 50 amp ;)
  9. Okie_dave

    Okie_dave SILVER Star

    Messages:
    685
    Location:
    Tulsa, OK
    I have never seen a 100V electric dryer. If the circuit is 220V, it should have 2 breakers ganged together in the breaker box.

    If that is the case, you can wire the welder to that outlet. If the welder draws over 30 amps, it will pop the breaker. The breaker is there to protect the wire. The wire size coming out of breaker box determine what size breaker is needed.
  10. Timoss

    Timoss Regular Member

    Messages:
    230
    The dryer is 220v. It uses a dual 110/220 circuit because the timer and such on the dryer uses the lower voltage--at least that's my understanding. There is indeed a ganged 30 amp breaker on the circuit. It could easily be upgraded to a 50 amp--the wire is big enough to handle 50 amps at the length it runs now.

    The plug is currently a typical 220v "appliance" type (three slots in a Y configuration). I initially asked the question because I was wondering if I could make a heavy duty adapter cord (a regular receptacle on one end with an appliance plug to matche the outlet on the other) so I could plug in a table saw, compressor, etc.--at least until I was able to run another line.

    Timoss
    88 fj62 TLCA
  11. Landpimp

    Landpimp New Member

    Messages:
    12,956
    Location:
    PNW
    Tim, you can do exactaly what your planing. The darn plug ends(the dryer end) are about $20 though


  12. fj40charles

    fj40charles GOLD Star

    Messages:
    2,779
    Location:
    Texas
    Are you sure you can upgrade to a 50 amp breaker? I'm betting that the wire to the dryer is a 10 gauge. You'll need a 6 gauge for 50 amps.

    Lots of guys have done what you're asking. I don't see any issues with it. Hard to mess up the wiring since you have 2 hots and 1 ground.

    Depending on where you panel is located, it might be easy to run another circuit.
  13. Cruiserdrew

    Cruiserdrew SILVER Star

    Messages:
    11,674
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA
    My garage is on the backside of the utility room where the dryer is. SInce the dryer is gas, the 220 (actually 238V at my place) plug was not used. I opened up the wall on the garage side, pulled the wires through (they were 8 ga unfortunately), and installed a plug on the the garage side. I just matched the socket up with the welder plug. Technically the welder can draw above the 30amps of the circuit, but since I'm not building a battleship, I've never tripped it.

    On the same circuit, I also ran another socket for the compressor which can draw 8-9 amps. I have sice learned this is not to code, and the plan is to take it out and have the garage wiring redone by a real electrician, with a subpanel, multiple 220 outlets, and more capacity. Still, It works, I'm just careful with my use patterns.
  14. amos715

    amos715 New Member


    X2 on the wire size, if you go 50amp make sure you have 6 gauge wire or larger, if you over load small gauge wire with lots of amp you could burn something down.
  15. bsevans

    bsevans Focus on the Journey SILVER Star

    Messages:
    2,011
    Location:
    Southern Arizona
    8 gage wire is rated at 40 amps. You could run that into a subpanel in the garage and install a 30 amp 220v service for your welder and a 15 amp 110v outlet for your compressor. Square D makes a breaker that has one 220v line and two 110v lines that only requires two breakeouts.
  16. brownbear

    brownbear Mod in Hibernation Moderator

    Messages:
    6,613
    Location:
    True North Strong and Free
    Most dryers run 220 and 110. The 110 is for the timer I guess. The 220 is for the coil.

    Yes, 100% for sure you can use this outlet. Just buy a dryer plug. You only use the prongs that are 220. Do not use the forth prong.

    I run my welder and my heater on this source. I made a 50 foot extension cable with the dryer plug on one end and the welder socket on the other. I also put a welder plug on my heater so I can just unplug one or the other.
  17. LandCruiserPhil

    LandCruiserPhil New Member

    Messages:
    10,967
    Location:
    Scottsdale Arizona
    FWIW - The motor and timer/controls on a dryer is 110V only the heat is 220V
  18. brew8

    brew8 SILVER Star

    Messages:
    1,689
    Originally posted by OKI-DAVE:

    220V is just 2 - 110V line 180* out of phase.

    Actually in phase just opposite sides of a center tapped transformer, but in phase..
  19. ar2stp48

    ar2stp48 New Member

    Messages:
    259
    Location:
    Magnolia, Arkansas
    x2 on brew8's comment. Your entire house service is simply 2 lines of 110 (117) volts and a ground. When they enter the breaker box, they attach to non-adjacent lugs or taps---plug in a double breaker and you get 110 for each of the feed lines; therefore 220 volts.
    Dryer IS a dedicated 220 volt line. The plug could be of a couple of designs, but the input into the dryer is 220v. Inside the dryer, the timer taps one of the wires for 110v; full 220v goes to heat element.

    IF the outlet is not needed for dryer, why not simply pick up the correct 220v outlet at HD/Lowes to match your saws plug and replace the outlet on the wall. Trip the breaker, remove cover, remove and replace. No adapter needed. Follow the color code of the wires. The wire to the "pin" is the ground; the "blades" are each 110v.
  20. cruiser_guy

    cruiser_guy Moderator

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Wherever the truck stops!!
    A typical dryer plug has 4 wires. A neutral, a ground and TWO hot wires. You can run the saw or whatnot IF you use the correct two wires. The potential problem you have is that the saw is NOT protected by the dryer breaker as the saw is probably only rated at 8-10 amps. You'd need to overload the saw by 3 times!

    Personally I would NOT recommend it simply for the safety of your tools.

    Running a 220v circuit is not that difficult and then you could have the correct breaker and plugs.

    Your home insurance may not look too kindly on your wiring handywork if an overloaded tool starts a fire!

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