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Rear Locker Locking

Discussion in '80-Series Tech' started by landtoy80, Aug 25, 2003.

  1. landtoy80

    landtoy80

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    How long does it take for the rear electric locker to lock in when you are on a steep trail that doesn't need the rear locked butn then the trail get to the piont that it needs to be locked?
    On the flat I can lock my Cable locker in and out just by driving forword or back a bit. On the trail when things are bound up a bit, the front electric locker pops right in. The Downey cable locker sometimes wont slip in for a couple of tire rotations. I know that the front has fins splines and the rear has corse splines.
    I just want to know if it is normal for the rear to take some time before it locks in?
    kurt
     
  2. Gumby

    Gumby Supamod Staff Member s-Moderator

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    Yes, although I have found the electric works a lot better when it's used a lot. After a day of wheelin it goes in and out pretty quick. Does the cable locker use the round spring and rack assembly? If so, those parts and the pin that goes into the housing could be binding. My pin really ought to be replaced as it has some pitting, but if I keep it lubed and clean it works well.

    All that being said, I would not trust a thing from Downey after experiencing their EFI "kit"
     
  3. landtoy80

    landtoy80

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    Its just a cable connected to the pin. The pin is screwed into the locker like the stock locker is, very simple. It would be the same as you pushin or pullin the pin in and out.
     
  4. Jon916996748

    Jon916996748

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    Im having somewhat the same problem, my rear isn't locking. I have to drive for about 2 mins before it will. Front pops on and off quite well.
     
  5. cruiserdan

    cruiserdan SupportingVendor Emeritus Supporting Vendor Moderator

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    Are you traveling in an arc when you attempt to lock? If you are traveling in a straight line, on a hard surface, they will probably NEVER lock. The dog clutch must be lined up. The only way that can happen is if the rear wheels are traveling at different speeds. The greater the difference, the faster the lock time.

    Thru beating dead horse....... ::)
     
  6. Riley

    Riley

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    I've put my lockers on a training program where I take them out to my sister's farm field and drive around locking and unlocking. Because it's dry out there, I need to do sharp turns to get them to lock/unlock. I figure after a month of this exercize program they should get in shape and work faster.

    Can't wait until the rains come and we can practice in mud.
     
  7. Beowulf

    Beowulf

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    Riley,
    Exercising will help to an extent but the primary factor controlling when the rear lockers engage is the dog clutch mechanism. It will help you visualize what has to happen if you'll take a close look at the following image.

    [​IMG]

    and

    [​IMG]

    p/n #41453 is the dog clutch mechanism circled in the first image. This has to line up with the locking piece that matches. In order for these to line up there must be a difference in the rear wheel rotation. The front axle has much smaller locking splines.

    HTH.

    -B-
     
  8. Big_Moose

    Big_Moose

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    Riley

    You can remove the actuator motor cover p/n#41460, and you will notice that the factor grease has crystalized from minimal mall use. Carefully clean out the grease, clean the motor contact surfaces, and apply a little bit of water proof, moly grease, and re-assemble. After a few activations, the new grease will make the locker / dog clutch engage quicker / easier. You still should engage the lockers in an arc.

    Joe
     
  9. landtoy80

    landtoy80

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    Well then there is no problem with my cable locker. It locks in and out when the dog is in line (good dog) when the dog is out of line(bad dog) it wont listen :mad:
    There is a way to adjust my cable if it doesn't lock. I just need to better train the dog :D
    kurt
     
  10. Gumby

    Gumby Supamod Staff Member s-Moderator

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    What loads the pin? DO you just push until it locks in?
     
  11. landtoy80

    landtoy80

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    The cable is solid, you pust till it slides in. Once you find the sweet spot the cable slides in and out with ease.

    Wow the teeth on that dog are BIG. No wounder it takes some time to lone those babise up.
    kurt
    kurt
     
  12. Riley

    Riley

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    So given the teeth must line up and thus there must be a difference in the rotation THEN should it not lock up quickly when in the mud/muck and the tire is spinning slowly?

    By this I mean:

    - I get stuck in the mud
    - then lock the rear diff once everything has stopped spinning
    - then slowly give it a bit of gas

    Would it not lock fairly quickly?

    I don't like the idea of having to lock before I get stuck because on the hard trail it would be a pain to lock/unlock.

    Another question - the job of cleaning and greasing the locker: I remember reading a detailed post about this somewhere perhaps sleeoffroad site? It does sound like a good project - any time estimates?

    When it's apart I guess I can't drive the truck so I like to know how long it's down for.
     
  13. landtoy80

    landtoy80

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    THere is one way to find out. Find a mud hole and get stuck. THe front locks right up right away on mine. I think a locked front will give more traction than a locked rear (I think/I hope). As I can lock my front without the rear locking, there is only one way to find out.
    kurt
     
  14. cruiserdan

    cruiserdan SupportingVendor Emeritus Supporting Vendor Moderator

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    Riley,

    Any surface or action that provides an opportunity for the wheels to rotate at different speeds will allow the dogs to line up. Remember, the faster the speed the more violent the drivetrain shock. That is why the factory locks are inhibited from locking if the vehicle speed is above 5MPH. Often wheelspin in a stuck vehicle can exceed that indicated speed even though the vehicle is not moving. As long as you are prudent in your throttle application, you should be fine. In the case of rock crawling, I do not like to try to lock on the obstacle unless it's un-avoidable. Sometimes you get a wheel-hop that breaks stuff right fast :eek:

    A foot note about the front end: Do avoid backing up with the front axle locked, if you are able to, particularly if the wheels are turned.

    Dan.
     
  15. Riley

    Riley

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    [quote author=cruiserdan link=board=2;threadid=4635;start=msg35822#msg35822 date=1062043649]

    A foot note about the front end: Do avoid backing up with the front axle locked, if you are able to, particularly if the wheels are turned.

    Dan.
    [/quote]

    Thanks Dan - what happens when backing up? The manual doesn't mention this. It seems weird.

    Mud holes is the kind of terrain that I encounter most often. Would you lock before hand?

    Riley
     
  16. cruiserdan

    cruiserdan SupportingVendor Emeritus Supporting Vendor Moderator

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    Riley,

    It seems that the forces in reverse are greater than when moving forward. It appears that breakage of birfs in particular is more apt to happen in reverse. It may result from a bunch of stored energy or someting like that. As far as the decision of when to lock is concerned, I prefer to lock before I enter an obstacle that looks like I might need it. In a case where you are in a soft material such as sand or mud you may possibly dig yourself in somewhat before you are locked and it could be more challenging to extract yourself from such a place even after you lock. If you enter it locked you may not dig in and just pass through. Momentum in some instances is the differece between getting through and walking. Diffs don't like to be locked "on-the-fly".


    Disclaimer: A personal opinion derived from personal experience over the past 30 years. "your mileage may vary"

    Cheers, Dan.