Help! Rust!

Discussion in '60-Series Wagons' started by SURFNE1, Oct 23, 2006.

  1. I have a rust problem on my recently purchased FJ60. The location is on the passenger side rear fender the rust is about 1'' diameter. How do i get rid of this and if i grind it out would it be safe to weld on the car? or are there any specific substances that can terminate the problem? thanks i really appriciate it.
  2. brownbear

    brownbear Mod in Hibernation Moderator

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    oh man.. lots to search on here. I promise good reading.

    but that said, pull the inside rear cargo interior on the sides. Only clips that are pressed in hold it in. So a small screw driver will pop it off. Once off you can see in the inside of the wheel well from the top. This is IMPORTANT. as you will see really how much rust you have.

    from my experience. generally the rust comes from the inside out.

    Look inside first. And yes you can cut it out and weld in new.

    Search quarter panel, POR-15, and rust. Lots of threads. Some companies make a path panel that can be welded in.
  3. Thanks ill check it out
  4. Rusty

    Rusty SILVER Star

    I went through all of this when I bought my rusty HJ60, I thought that I would restore the body using panels that were made by a company in Edmonton Alberta called 4wheel auto.



    http://store.4wheelauto.com/view_product.php?product=WHE9ZCMC9


    This turned out to be an over simplified repair however, the rear wheel well of an HJ/FJ 60/62 series is actually made up of 4 panels; 2 panels make up the wheel well above the tire and the quarter panel and the lower "C" pillar panel make up the exterior of the wheel well.

    The 2 wheel well panels are joined longitudinally above the tire and the outer wheel well panel is rolled 90 degrees. The “C” pillar and quarter panels are placed over the wheel well panels and spot welded to it. That’s why they rot so bad; dirt, water and road salt get in between the panels and go to town rotting both sides out, which leads eventually to a hole clean into the interior of the truck.


    To fix the wheel well properly you have to cut out the rot and first restore the inner panel. Then you have to fix the outer panel. This sounds easy and is repairable, like I mentioned earlier I was going to take this on with my HJ, so ordered outer panels from 4 wheel auto.

    In the photo in their on-line catalogue they look like machine stamped quality panels, but when I got them I was quite surprised, they were rippled and the radius on the wheel well lip was too great, they looked like crap. It was obvious that they were hand made; someone had simply taken some sheet metal, placed it over a good rear quarter on a Cruiser and hammered out the repair panel. The inside profile of the panel matched the outside profile of the panel, so the fit up would have been very poor and would have required 5 gallons of bondo to smooth things out.

    Factory panels were available at the dealer, but it would have cost around $4000 (Canadian dollars, which isn’t much different than the US dollar these days) and of course there would have been paint, and unfortunately labour since I wouldn’t have wanted to undertake that much body work. I do have my own shop at home and I have done sheet metal repair on my own vehicles in the past, but fitting up that many panels would have required welding a jig to the inside of the truck to keep its shape while the panels were cut out and replaced.

    Keep in mind I wanted to restore my truck, outfit it with everything I ever wanted and use it sanely off road in the summer months, parking it in the winter so that it would never rot again. If you want a daily driver bush truck to beat on that doesn’t look like a rust bucket then you might not mind patching up your truck, and it can be done, I‘ve seen plenty of trucks that look really good, but it either takes a lot of effort with skilled hands or a ton of cash to pay for someone else’s skilled hands!

    In the end I decided that I would find a stock FJ60 with a clean body and frame. I did a search through the auto trader using zip codes from cities in warm States, found several, took a week off work to travel and look at them, bought one and drove it home. Taking the time and trouble to find a Cruiser with rot free sheet metal is a lot easier and at least I found, cheaper than fixing one that has rotted out.
  5. brownbear

    brownbear Mod in Hibernation Moderator

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    I used those panels. They are the basic shape, then you also add to them with work.

    see my repairs on here..

    http://forum.ih8mud.com/showthread.php?t=52541&highlight=bj60 repainted

    I think if I had to do it again the Fj60 clean from arizona or what not is the way I would go. But that said my BJ60 repair has been fun. I am going on year 1 and half now in the repair.

    I have painted it white now, I should update. And my turbo is on and running(in the garage).
  6. Rusty

    Rusty SILVER Star

    brownbear is right, the 4 wheel auto panels are a basic fit, they would need further work to get them into proper shape. The part about getting them that disappointed me so much was that I paid a finished panel price for them, and this is what I expected, something that I could just weld in.

    I bought an OEM fender from Toyota and if I remember correctly it cost me about $400 or so, the 4 wheel auto wheel well panels cost me $600 for a pair of strips of rough finished sheet metal 3 inches wide.
  7. Tahnks everybody for the input but i think the best way to fix it is a patch i am a skilled welder in the tig and mig departments so i think ill do fine. but keep sending sugestions cause i might decide otherwise.
  8. haryv

    haryv

    Messages:
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    Rusty thanks for the info on the wheel wells

    My truck will also need the wheel wells replaced. Thay are rusted from the owner not seeing the crap build up over time. How ever the underside has been undercoated many times so there is no corrosion there.

    I was wondering if anyone had the idea of welding square tube jigs to the underside of a new wheel lips so the wheel well keeps its shape after removal. Then drilling out the wheel well and used that as a mold for fiberglass fenders what do you think? To install the new fiberglass wheel wells put a layer of rubber sealent or better longer lasting sealent between the fiberglass fender and sheet metal then drill out rivet holes and rivit the wheel well to the body what do you think? Thay would be easy to remove for inspection in the future by drilling out the existing rivets. BTW there is sealent used for heavy lift helicopter rotor heads that is tough as heck to remove and sticks like steel. Wish I knew the name of the sealent I would use that.
  9. nikos8

    nikos8

    Messages:
    469
    Location:
    New York City
    You have a 1" diameter rust spot? My friend you don't know what rust is. Seriously, if it isn't rusted through, I would grind it down to white metal and bondo the area. If it is rusted through, cut it out and replace it with a piece of sheet metal. It doesn't sound too bad of a problem.
  10. beatdown83fj60

    beatdown83fj60

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Evergreen, Colorado
    If it wasn't for rust, I wouldn't have my Fj60 lol
  11. brownbear

    brownbear Mod in Hibernation Moderator

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    harvy, The sealent used in aircraft that is amazing is called PRC. No idea what it stands for. There is many different types of PRC, but the standard stuff is brown in colour when put on. Its flexible for ever and stays stuck. It took man to the moon. With out it pressure vessels would not be able to pressurise for flight

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