converting 110v to 220v line

Discussion in 'Workshop and Home Improvement' started by JohnnyC, Jun 3, 2011.

  1. JohnnyC

    JohnnyC Long ago TLCA# 2231 SILVER Star

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    For those that may know...or...those that do it for a living....how much does it typically run to convert a 110v outlet to 220v if I were to pay somebody?

    My wife would like a very large AC unit in the kitchen...220V AC unit.

    I know it really comes down to seeing whats there to make a determination....but...just to get a ball park figure how much would it cost to run the line and install the outlet...not install the AC...just the electric

    thanks in advance :)
  2. fj40charles

    fj40charles GOLD Star

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    I'm guessing it will be $300 to $600 depending on where you live. Lots of variables such as location of panel, access to wires, Union electrician, etc.,
  3. john_eckels

    john_eckels SILVER Star

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    It's going to require a new line. 220 has more wires than 110. Also, do you have 2 slots free in your breaker box? If not, that will substantially increase the cost.
  4. Ummm... What? 110V has hot, neutral, and ground. 220V has two hots and a ground - no neutral.

    Further, as 220V drops the amperage the wire size required drops as well. So likely that the same size wires will work.

    If the original 110V circuit is dedicated, it COULD be as simple as a new breaker on the one end and a new plug on the other end. But not enough information by the OP to tell if that is the case.

    If the original 110V circuit is part of a series, then new wire will have to be run and price will also depend on distance of the run and accessibility to run new wires.
  5. kiwidog

    kiwidog Kiwidog SILVER Star

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    Red Deer Alberta
    220/110

    Hi Johnny,

    In the kitchen there are probably a couple of outlets that have the duplex outlet split so the top outlet is on a different circuit than the bottom. This is done so you can plug a kettle in one and some thing else that take a heavy load in the other so your don't get nuisance blows.
    There is 220 at the outlet between the red and black wires. There is 110 between the red and white and 110 between the black and white wires.
    You could build a plug set-up which has two male plugs to go into each recepticle in the duplex outlet. Join the two white Neutral wires together and the two grounds together and you will have 220 between the the two wires that are the phase wires on the two 110 plugs. Use 14-3 flexible wire to wire the three plugs together. Wire the four wires, two hots one grounds and one neutral into a 220 female plug that fits the male plug on your a/c unit. You should have 15 amps minimum for each leg, so 30 amps total so you should be able to run a decent sized a/c unit. It won't be a permanent wiring set-up but it will run. Keep the adapter you have just made for your a/c unit or you could run a 220 table saw with as well(not at the same time).
    The breaker for this type of kitchen circuit is the one with two breaker switches joined with a small bar so if one side blows it pulls the others side with it.
    If you don't feel comfortable doing this the don't. It is a bit if a jerry rig that will work in a pinch.
    Advice given without knowing your knowledge or circumstances so please be careful you could injure or kill yourself if done wrong.

    Thanks jb
  6. JohnnyC

    JohnnyC Long ago TLCA# 2231 SILVER Star

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    LOL this is tops on my list...i try to stay away from the elec stuff :)

    I think there may be a breaker for the one outlet...or so its labled as such in the breaker box...I will need to turn off the power on the breaker and see if anyother outlets turn off with it...

    there are alot of open spots on the box...its large and looks recently done...as the house is a 1960's.

    If the outlet is dedicated to one breaker could i fesable just use the wire and put in a 220dual breaker? kinda sounds that would be the case?

    BTW thanks for all the responces...very helpful...even if i dont do it...it will save me from getting hosed by a fast talker :) when i know whats going on
  7. As I said in my one post, if it is a dedicated circuit to that one outlet and the wire is sized appropriately for the needs of the 220V a/c unit, then you can do this.
  8. JohnnyC

    JohnnyC Long ago TLCA# 2231 SILVER Star

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  9. Based on the amperage required and the distance of the run you'll be able to calculate the wire size needed. Use something like this:

    Voltage Drop Calculator JavaScript

    Then determine the size of the current wiring.
  10. look is the outlet a dedicated outlet? if it is it is not hard at all, being in the kitchen it should already be a 20 amp 12 wire circuit, if it is not dedicated than a new out line should be run and that would include the outlet for the ac.

    i know you are wondering if it is dedicated, just find the breaker in your panel that feeds that out let and shut it off, then check to see if any other out lets are dead.

    also the year your house was built in plays a big role in 20 amp only in the kitchen, the size and amperage of the ac unit, and if your panel has room plays a big role in price!
  11. fieldsken1

    fieldsken1 SILVER Star

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    just put 2- 110v together = 220

  12. -Spike-

    -Spike-

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    Some of the advice in this thread is... questionable. If you are short of knowledge on electricity- and it sounds like you are- get an electrician to give you advice. Whether in person or here or someplace else on the 'net, make sure the advice you take is from someone who really knows their stuff.
  13. Unless you end up with two 110V hots from the same leg - in which case it will backfeed through the ground and cause you no end of trouble if not danger.
  14. fledglingme

    fledglingme

    Messages:
    85
    let's get the horse in FRONT of the carriage- what is the power requirement of the new ac unit?
  15. LAMBCRUSHER

    LAMBCRUSHER

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    WINNER!!!
  16. No reason for you to get backfeed on the ground. In this case the ground is an equipment ground only and should have no potential unless there is an equipment failure.
  17. JohnnyC

    JohnnyC Long ago TLCA# 2231 SILVER Star

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    well the wife wants one thats not 220 but 110 now...its on sale for 10% off

    she just made it a bit easyer

    I was going to run a new line and put in a new 220 outlet then add the 220 beaker...but...at least its easyer now...thanks all for trying to help out and not get me killed LOL
  18. fledglingme

    fledglingme

    Messages:
    85
    not quite, landcruiser..i can think of conditions where the ground is pressed into service. like in the controls, often tranformers, indicator lights, and printed circut boards sometime use the gound to avoid making (and stocking) these parts for both 110 and 220 volt apps. i don't know how they get away with it, but they seem to have no problems doing it!
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2011
  19. At one time yes but you will not find it in todays appliances.

    NEC 250.6. Objectionable Current Flowing Through The Grounding Path
    (A) Arrangement to Prevent Objectionable Current. To prevent a fire or electric shock, the grounding of electrical systems, circuit conductors, electrical equipment, and conductive metal parts must be done in a manner that objectionable current will not flow over the effective fault current path.
  20. fieldsken1

    fieldsken1 SILVER Star

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    well was i right or wrong??????????????


    i need to know

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