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Can you flat tow an FJ80??

Discussion in '80-Series Tech' started by egossner, Jul 2, 2007.

  1. egossner

    egossner New Member

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    2
    Were trying to determine if the 1993 FJ80 can be towed safely behind a motor home. Anyone have any thoughts or experience on this?
  2. Skillet

    Skillet Skillet SILVER Star

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    I have seen them being flat towed, so I know you can do it.

    What special equipment or prep it may require, I do not know. Sorry.
  3. -Spike-

    -Spike- New Member

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    Thoughts, yes. Experience, no.

    There's no mechanical reason that I know of that an 80 couldn't be flat-towed indefinitely. Put the transfer case in neutral and hook it up. You better have a big tow vehicle though. The safety factor is going to be how much the motor home can safely tow.

    -Spike
  4. murf

    murf Lifer SILVER Star

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    According to Toyota Technical Service bulletin AX001-00, the 92-00 Landcruiser should not be "dinghy" towed (4 wheels on the ground). I am trying to attach a copy of the TSB - hope it comes through. Cant give you any particulars why though.
  5. DanKunz

    DanKunz New Member

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    if that t-case slips for any reason it will be an ugly day for an AWD vehicle. If I were to do it I would yank both driveshafts to be safe.
  6. -Spike-

    -Spike- New Member

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    And if someone's gun went off in your direction it would likely be an ugly day for you, so you should wear a Kevlar suit to be safe. However, that's not very convenient. Neither is removing the driveshafts. The likelyhood of a transfer case jumping into gear is probably less than the likelyhood of you interfering with a bullet's right-of-way. I'd put the transmission in neutral as well as the transfer case, and rather than spending a half-hour pulling driveshafts I'd spent an extra 30 seconds verifying the gear selections before locking the towed vehicle. Having to pull the driveshafts kinda negates the convenience of having a second vehicle with you on a motor home vacation. Yes, it is safer, but if I lived my life doing the safest possible thing in every situation I wouldn't have a life to begin with.

    -Spike
  7. FJ40Jim

    FJ40Jim The Pompatus of Cruisers SILVER Star

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    No flat towing

    According to service publication RM360U, the FZJ80 can be flat towed at speeds up to 45KPH for distances up to 80Km.

    HTH.
  8. miked

    miked New Member

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    I thought I somewhere on this board that the t-case has an oil pump that is driven by the input shaft. While flat towing, there is no oil being pumped. I'd look into getting those quick disconnects for the shafts.
  9. -Spike-

    -Spike- New Member

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    That would change my tune in a hurry. :D

    -Spike
  10. landtank

    landtank SILVER Star

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    One other thing, most trailers above 3500 lbs have brakes. The truck weighs more and while it has brakes they are not tied into the tow vehicle.
  11. Grench

    Grench SILVER Star

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    THAT makes a lot of sense as to why they say to keep it under 45. No trailer brakes.

    Now... How about flat towing an 80 with an 80?

    What about flat towing a 6,000 lb armored 80 with a stock 80?

    I've seen stuff like this going down the highway to/from the auto auction. Cars towing cars with bumper clipped to bars... I've also watched them do a ballerina pirouette down the interstate at 70mph...

    Who makes a tow bar that could handle the connection? Hmm...

    I wouldn't want to connect to the stock front bumper. I think an ARB might handle it... or bolting right to the frame horns.... Just thinking out loud.

    Dangerous ideas, YMMV.

  12. murf

    murf Lifer SILVER Star

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    I talked to a Toyota tech and confirmed this statement as to why...
  13. Miescha

    Miescha New Member

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    No joke - I towed my '96 home from Minnesota to St. Louis two years ago on a trailer. The tow vehicle was my '02 Yukon XL Denali with factory tow package (and trailer brake wiring). The trailer was a Felling dual axle (6k each axle for 12k total weight). Six people and gear in the denali and at least 500 lbs of gear in the cruiser on the trailer.

    The first 10 miles of towing was white knuckle until I got the trailer brake controller set correctly and learned how to better use it (with only the slightest brake pressure to activate the trailer brakes and slow the trailer without overly braking the tow vehicle).

    Really, my heart was jumping out of my chest the first time I hit the brakes and the trailer pushed the rear end of the Yukon out to the side. I'm pretty sure I wet my pants, creased my leather seat and shouted like a small girl.

    Oh yeah, don't use ratcheting straps regardless of the strength rating. Go with chains and binders. Some a-hole cut two of my straps while stopped for the night. Luckily, the pre-departure check discovered them.
  14. cruiserdan

    cruiserdan SupportingVendor Emeritus Moderator Supporting Vendor

    Which basicly means "don't do it" unless it's an emergency.
  15. bruisercruiser

    bruisercruiser Regular Member

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    There are a couple of products that are spendy that you might want to look in to. Roadmaster and Blue OX are the two that come to mind.

    If I remember right Roadmaster has a tranny pump which will prevent you from having to disconnect the driveline as it keeps oil flowing.

    The Blue Ox I believe has a "manual" brake system in which the brake pedal of the car behind the motorhome is actually "pulled" when the brake pedal on the motorhome is pushed. The action causes the towed car to slow.

    I'm working off of memory so forgive me if you do a search and I've led you down a wrong path.

    Roadmaster had some bad press initially in regards to pump failure but aparently they are little to no issues now and according to the company there never was a significant issue.

    I think it would be ill advised to tow a heavy cruiser behind any motorhome other then a diesel pusher. I have an older motorhome with a gas Chevy 454 and I'm sure it would pull a car the weight of a cruiser but not for long.:crybaby:

    Good Luck. I feel your pain. I would love to tow my cruiser.
  16. cockroach

    cockroach Regular Member

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    Confirmed by experience.......rear output shaft on a Jeep T/C seized while flat towing and lost the D/S. :eek::eek::eek:

    Fortunately, the pogo manuever was avoided.

    In the Jeep camp, some run locking hubs in the rear to facilitate easy flat tows.
  17. KliersLC

    KliersLC New Member

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  18. egossner

    egossner New Member

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    Great feedback everyone! When I said "safely behind a motorhome" I meant without damage to the driveline. The tow vehical is more of a bus, 350 cummins, around 18000 lb towing capacity.

    Thanks to Kliers for those links-if I was looking for dingy towing-not flat towing!

    I'm off to Toyota to see what the transmission tech has to say about all this...
  19. KliersLC

    KliersLC New Member

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    Those ARE flat towing links

    PM Tuner, he has already done the research for you.
  20. KliersLC

    KliersLC New Member

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    Location:
    San Diego, CA


    All of the above mention "flat towing" it seems like a waste of time for you to come on here and ask the question, and then go take the advice of a toyota tech who does not know Land Cruisers. 99% of Toyota trained techs will say not to do it--not because they know why, but because the FSM says not to.

    Some of the people on this board have been there done that.



    Note: The above quotes were taken from each of the three linked threads.

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