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Axle overhaul hell

Discussion in '40- & 55-Series Tech' started by Guest, Mar 11, 2003.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    noticed you're axle overhaul guide at ih8mud.com. It's excellent- so good I thought I'd go through my fj40's front end, as both knuckle have been weeping 90wt since I bought the truck. At any rate, I busted my hub off, and 90wt started pouring out. I forged ahead, pulled the spindle (took some taps and lots of crap brushing), and GUSH! It appears the whole thing was lubed with oil rather than grease (the conical bearings looked in excellent condition, though!).

    Anyway, I digress. In the process of removing the knuckle I ran into a problem. The front two cone washers holding the steering arm will not come off. I've hammered until the studs have started to bulge at the top... brushed, soaked in pb-blaster for 2 days and they simply won't budge. As a last ditch effort before totally freaking out, I thought I'd bug you for ideas. Any ideas? I'm stuck.

    thanks in advance,
    Aaron Stranahan
     
  2. Chef

    Chef

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    Did you get all the cones out of the other side? That'll help some. A big hammer and a brass drift (or just a big brass hammer)will finish the job without destroying the studs. Time to buy tools! if all else fails, and I mean all else, put vise grips on the stud, and try to spin the whole thing out. It sounds like you'll be replacing some anyway. Brass tolls are very important when ya gots to beat on stuff...Alan
     
  3. Pin_Head

    Pin_Head

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    Fuggedabout beating on it.

    You need the 98 cent knuckle bearing cap/arm removing special service tool:
    Get a 4 inch x 1/2 fine thread bolt and two nuts and a 4 inch piece of 1/2 ID pipe. Cut the head off the bolt and grind the end into a point. Thread both nuts all the way on the bolt, insert the thread end into the pipe and then stuff the tool into the ball housing so that the point fits into one of the holes in the cap. Then start turning the nuts to press the cap out.
     
  4. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I found(as the previous gentleman did) that using a brass hammer and also a small chisel. Just a small word of advice...be careful not to damage the steering knuckle spindle. Mine was damaged by the previous owner by not having any grease in the front end and it took me a LONG time to find another one.

    Good luck.
     
  5. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I certainly have no problem buying some brass drifts/hammers. Where should I buy'em? Sears? Harbor Freight? Big Ed's hardware? I just don' remember seeing them before ('course I haven't been looking).

    Anyway, PinHead- I'm looking at your method and want to be sure I'm thinking right. You want me to stick this makeshift press inside te knuckle where I pulled the birf from, abnd pushe the steering arm off by putting the point into the hole in the cernter under the arm? I assume the washers being in there won't mess things up too badly? Also, are these studs removveable? If I were to remove them, do I just spin them clockwise/backwards??

    thanks!!
    AS

    btw- if myt spelling is atrocious, its because the type on theis form keeps showing up white on white... driving me nuts!!!
     
  6. 3_puppies

    3_puppies SILVER Star

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    I got my brass hammers from harbor freight, I got a one and a two pounder?, they work when you need'em. Did you try hitting both sides of the arm at the same time? Some times that'll work. I thought your bad spelling was because you knuckles were all buggered up and that was the best ya could do. :D :D
     
  7. Halo3

    Halo3

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    I have to second the Harbor Freight vote. I have nothing against Craftsman...own my fair share of Craftsman tools...but when you can get a similar, life-time warranted tool from Harbor Freight & not pay the premium for the Craftsman name, why not?!

    Be forewarned that most Harbor Freight employees will have no idea what a brass drift pin is...at least that was my experience in the Aurora, CO Harbor Freight. They can (or should) be found in the section with all the rest of the punches & cold chisels are.

    Good luck!!
     
  8. woody

    woody Internet Fireman Staff Member

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    a breass hammer is a brass hammer....tho the chisel trick is what's worked for me.

    BTW: Check your browser settings to make sure you can display pages properly....in IE it's Tools > Internet Options > General Tab > Accessibility...if anything is checked among those 4, colors will not work.

    PM me if you still have problems, or post up in the questions/comments section.
     
  9. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Well, I'll see if I can get the warden to let me out tonight for a tool run. I have to admit that I don't hold much hope for the beating method (though it may work out some frustration). I'll give it a shot, then try pressing it out.

    couple questions-
    1) What exactly is the "chisel" method? Do you mean to hammer the chisel between the steering arm and knuckle body as a sort of wedge? Or do you mean to gouge the sh*t out of the cone washer? I tried the former and actually gouged the metal with no movement in the steering arm!
    2) Will I be able to find replacement washers should I screw these up? Also, are replacement studs available or even an option should I get too mideval on them??


    thanks! :D
    AS
     
  10. Pin_Head

    Pin_Head

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  11. kruzrtek

    kruzrtek

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    I would also go for the harbor freight tools. But I think what has worked best for me is to take the chisel(smaller, thin tip)
    and put it into the slot of the cone washer if it has one then tap it with the hammer to split the washer apart and pop it out. also works for hubs equipped with cone washers. If you have access to a acetylene torch, then heat the arm itself and sometimes that will push the washers out. Or if worse comes to worse, take the torch and just cut the arm in half, and I gaurantee the washers will come out!!!
    I am usually not so respondant as such a HACK, but you caught me on a bad night!!

    Kruzrtek
     
  12. Vortec_Cruiser

    Vortec_Cruiser

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    You can usually get away with hitting the studs with a regular hammer if you threat the nut back on, until the end of the stud is just below the top of the nut. Also, smacking the corner of the steering arm with a hammer will usually pop up the cone washer in that corner. Another option is to put the end of a chisel or screwdriver in the split, and hit with your trusty hammer. ::)
     
  13. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I just ordered (2) FAX Knuckle studs from SOR for my 1979 FJ40. They have (3) different ones available. Just order the year you need. They are on page 80, Part # 22a, 22b, 22c. Received very nice quality. They also have the cone washers, called Knuckle dowels on same page. IH8mud has a very good article on front axle overhaul which is very informative and helpful. E-mail me if you have questions. I just finished doing the whole job.

    Jim D
     
  14. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I finally got the knucke apart today. It took a great deal of coaxing, but the washers came out. I am certainly glad I was able to get it done- I'll feel a lot better with cleaned and painted parts and new seals and gaskets.

    I really appreciate the help I've received here. It is far beyond what I expected and it really is a beatiful thing.
    THANKS!!!

    :D :D :D