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33 and 35 inch snow tires

Discussion in '80-Series Tech' started by John E Davies, Nov 3, 2004.

  1. John E Davies

    John E Davies

    Messages:
    734
    Location:
    Spokane WA, USA
    I wanted to give you guys with lifted trucks a heads-up about oversized snow tires. I did extensive research last winter and found only one readily available tire that was made in 33 and 35 inch sizes - the Yokohama Geolander I/T+. I bought a set last winter and they work GREAT - much more stable and grippy than my siped MT/Rs on packed snow and ice. They look wussy compared to the high-testosterone mud tires, but a wussy Cruiser on the road is worth 10 macho ones in the ditch ;) OTH they absolutely suck in mud and are barely marginal on loose dry gravel.

    http://www.yokohamatire.com/TireIntro.asp?TireID=13

    http://www.yokohamatire.com/pdf/geoit.pdf

    Note that the first page "Sizes" section does NOT list big truck sizes. The pdf brochure lists the LT285/75R16 (33.1 inches) and LT315/75R16 (34.6 inches) sizes. I bought mine from Discount Tires locally. The manager was NOT aware that the big sizes were available, but he nicely ordered my 285s anyway with no problems. Since then he has sold several more sets to guys running oversized tires and he reports that they are happy.

    Cost was about $160 each.

    Be safe this winter.

    John
  2. MTNRAT

    MTNRAT

    Messages:
    1,179
    Location:
    Fernie B.C.
    I have the 315s in the yoko IT. Used them all last winter, after I decided my siped MTRs sucked on snow and ice. Worked really well. Never tried them on mud or anything else, cuz when the snow falls around here it covers everything.
    Cheers,
    Sean
  3. waldrtw

    waldrtw

    Messages:
    391
    Location:
    Wilmington, NC
    Have heard mixed thoughts on tires for snow. I need some help from you guys to help me out. What is better a mud tire of all terrain/snow tire in the snow? I have heard that all terrrians are better in packed snow but mud tires are better in deep snow. I made my first snow run of the year yesterday and My X-terrians suck in the snow. It will not hold me from slidding down sideways. Just wondered what I should get for the snow. Thought about BFG All terrrians.

    tim
  4. landtank

    landtank SILVER Star

    Messages:
    16,957
    Location:
    Boston MA
    Well my X-terrains out perform my BFG ATs any day in the snow, but that's on roads not trails. Different terrain will require different tires so don't jump to the conclusion that because you had some issue driving sideways on a hill that it will relate to on road use.

    Here in MA when we get snow it's wet, heavy and deep. The Ats just can't handle that kind of snow while the X-terrains self clean excellent and chew right through the stuff.
  5. >> My X-terrians suck in the snow. It will not hold me from slidding down sideways. <<

    A lot of things could cause this. Were you locked or unlocked? What tyre pressure were you running?

    -B-
  6. mabrodis

    mabrodis

    Messages:
    1,192
    Location:
    Castle Rock, CO
    That's funny about the Geolander I/T tires. My mom was tire shopping yesterday and ended up getting those on her Honda CR-V from Discount Tire. They look like a normal winter tire, very similar to the Blizzak ones we have on my wife's car, lots of factory sipes, etc.

    As for A/T or M/T tires in snow. I'd take M/T tires. They might not grip quite as well but if you need to spin and actually dislodge (hehe :D, spray) snow, the A/T are mostly useless IMO. My MTRs have done very well in snow I think. The tread is way down now so they definetly aren't doing as good, also all my sipes have wornout, but I think I'll sipe the last bit to see if that gains me anything before it's throwout time.
  7. CDN_Cruiser

    CDN_Cruiser

    Messages:
    1,047
    I would say that it completely depends on the snow you are driving in. If you are on a trail with 2 feet of powder, your needs are different from roads with packed snow, ice and black ice'.

    If it's the former, a good open tread offroad tire may be better given its ability to clear the tread. If it's the latter, snowtires, without question will outperform any mud, AT, etc tire. The major reason for this is less the tread design (which is still critically important) vs. the compound that is used.

    Cheers, Hugh (snows on my car, but not on the truck...)
  8. waldrtw

    waldrtw

    Messages:
    391
    Location:
    Wilmington, NC
    I run did not lock the front or rear in the snow unless I need it. I was running them at 12 PSI. I I still slide sideways. It was about 16 inches of fresh snow. My friend was driving his 62 with 33 bfg All terrians and had no problems. The x-terrians wrok great goind up for down hills but when the trail is a slight slope to the edge of a 100 ft. cliff they don't do very well. I just keep sliddding toward the cliff! Had to get some Jeep to winch me backwars so I didn't go off.

    Tim
  9. John E Davies

    John E Davies

    Messages:
    734
    Location:
    Spokane WA, USA
    Picking the right snow tire is tricky and always a compromise. If you need a tire that will keep you out of the ditches during a commute on ice and packed snow you really need a automotive-type snow tire with a gazillion sipes and tiny tread blocks. A chunky mud tread will just hydroplane due to the lack of gripping edges and low-pressure footprint. Siping a mud tire helps some for stopping and starting but doesn't do a thing to help lateral stability.

    OTH a tire for deep fresh snow/ offroad use should be more like a mud tire with sipes. It can claw down for grip and sling the snow backwards rather than just clogging and spinning.

    Of course the best arrangement may be road-type snow tires and a couple of pairs of rugged chains for the really deep stuff. I carry 4 chains when I head out in winter on a long road trip. I haven't had to use them yet but they make me feel good.

    I love driving on snowy roads in my LX with proper tires. I just wish all the cars would stay at home ;(

    John
  10. IdahoDoug

    IdahoDoug

    Messages:
    8,780
    Interesting fun fact on snow and tires. Self cleaning is not a desireable trait for snow. Turns out snow does not stick to rubber as well as it sticks to itself, so a block of snow in your tread provides better grip.

    The answer to your question is in fact a question. Several questions, actually. You need to state what snowy conditions you're trying to improve your mobility in. There is no tire that will do both on road and offroad winter conditions optimally as noted above.

    DougM
  11. alia176

    alia176 SILVER Star

    Messages:
    8,388
    Location:
    Tijeras, NM
    I picked up a set of Yoko Geo AT-II+ for $125/each (not installed) at my local Discount tires. Showed them advert from Tirerack for $136/each and they beat it by $11. :flipoff2:

  12. landtank

    landtank SILVER Star

    Messages:
    16,957
    Location:
    Boston MA

    What color pills are you on today? As soon as the tread packs in with snow you start floating along. You'll never be able to dig down to pavement or dirt. The BFG Ats packed in terribly and I couldn't turn for shit, just floated along in a straight line for the most part. The X-terrains dig into snow and I have much better control with them.
  13. cruiserdan

    cruiserdan SupportingVendor Emeritus Moderator Supporting Vendor

    Hi Rick,


    How's it going?


    I see you are in rare form this afternoon.....:D


    You should not sugar-coat so much...:rolleyes: It's hard to tell where you are coming from.


    Did you get the water pipe back on?



    D-
  14. MTNRAT

    MTNRAT

    Messages:
    1,179
    Location:
    Fernie B.C.
    alia, whats that got to do with snow tires? Actually I did use a set of those for one winter. Not bad for an AT.
    Cheers,
    Sean
  15. landtank

    landtank SILVER Star

    Messages:
    16,957
    Location:
    Boston MA
    Hey Dan, the truck's back on the road and we had NO trick or treaters so the sugar intake is a little on the high side.
  16. Nothing007

    Nothing007

    Messages:
    18
    Location:
    Czech Republic
  17. In my experience, Nokian winter tires are the best in the world. You can't beat them. I've tried Blizzaks but they wore out way too quickly. I've tried the Yokohama Geolandar I/T and they were "okay". I've tried offerings from Good Year, Hankook, Pirelli, Cooper and Gislaved. The Gislaveds were 2nd behind the Nokians. Blizzaks were decent for the first winter only and then they were too worn to be classified as a winter tire. The Nokians I had lasted 5 winters and still looked to be about 85% tread. They worked as well as new still. But I sold them with the car. Those Finns know their winter tires!

    What makes a winter tire so much better in winter than a standard AT, MT or all-season tire is the siping, silica tread compound (remains flexible throughout the temperature range), and tread additives (in some cases crushed walnut shells). The ability of the tire to remain flexible (silica), shed water (sipes) and hold snow within the tread makes it a true winter tire.
  18. mickeyt

    mickeyt

    Messages:
    2,185
  19. Trustey

    Trustey

    Messages:
    22
    Location:
    La Grande
    I need something for deep snow and ice, including ice under snow and steep downhill descent. I think I am best with chains and not worrying about a specific winter tire.
  20. Grench

    Grench SILVER Star

    Messages:
    2,660
    Location:
    Omaha, NE
    This thread was dead for 9 years. Zombified.

    I'm using GY Duratrac tires on my wife's and my '96 FZJ80s year around - great in the snow. They have stud holes, but I've never really needed them here.

    Wife's: 265/75R16
    Mine: 315/75R16

    Once you chain up though, you may as well have serious hard casings like MTR tires get.

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