3.4 Timing belt tensioner compression-need some help!!

Discussion in '95+ Gen Toyota Trucks' started by SBFJ60FIG, Nov 13, 2010.

  1. SBFJ60FIG

    SBFJ60FIG

    Messages:
    1,015
    Location:
    Chicago!
    Hey all,

    I'm doing a t-belt as we speak. I got the Schlay tool to compress the tensioner. I did not seen to find the spot for the locking pin to fit into so I removed the compression tool. Well, now the the tensioner does not seem to be returning to tension...it seems to be stuck compressed?

    Anyone seen this? If I remember correctly, the tensioner's function is not linked to oil pressure or the engine running.

    More succinctly, can you compress the tensioner too far and get it stuck...or is this just a function of this truck having like 250k miles on it and that it will pop out soon enough?

    Thanks in advance for the assistance all.
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2010
  2. mmml4

    mmml4

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    272
    Location:
    Decatur,AL
    IIRC it is operated by oil pressure. One reason I say that is when you compress it, it forces the oil out very slowly. If it were a spring you could compress it quickly.
  3. ken_79-fj40

    ken_79-fj40

    Messages:
    1,237
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    If it's got 250k on it why not just replace the tensioner? I change it every time I do the belt. They come with a locking pin in them already. Bolt it on, take out the pin, and it tensions the belt. IIRC the tensioner wasn't much more than the tool.
  4. SBFJ60FIG

    SBFJ60FIG

    Messages:
    1,015
    Location:
    Chicago!
    For one, I don't like to replace parts that are still good. Very often people put new parts on just because. Example the thermostat, probably the MOST replaced part that is almost all the time still good...to a lesser degree a water pump. If you need to take a ton of stuff off to get to the part (water pump) and you're replacing the timing belt anyway sure. But the if the tensioner is perfectly functional and good for the life of the engine and more...therefore, I would not replace it.

    I took some detailed photographs of what the issue was with this tensoner which I'd imagine I'm far from the only person who has had this problem...I'll post them later with an explanation.

    Also, since it has 250k on it, I don't want to take the AC compressor or anything else off that I don't have to. This thing is a rusty, broken bolt kinda car. Everything took a lot longer than it should have to complete...like 3x as long! It kind of sucked.
  5. Blue77FJ40

    Blue77FJ40 SILVER Star

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    2,153
    Location:
    MD
    If the vehicle is that rusty, you should become acquainted with the best penetrant on the market, Kroil.
  6. SBFJ60FIG

    SBFJ60FIG

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Chicago!
    Have to check it out...had the truck for awhile, so I was able to SOAK and I mean soak many of the crusty parts with a mix of PD blaster and plain old engine oil for days on end. Didn't do ****. The little washer in between the AC idler pulley and the bracket it mounts to, the big washer sort of thing was so rusted on that I actually broke the adjuster bolt while turning it to loosen it up. The pulley would not adjust at ALL. Finally got it apart and go the rest of the bolt on, sanded it and now the adjuster works just fine.

    In my experience, I just soak stuff with engine oil and hope for the best. Rust really makes a car hard to work on. Ten minute jobs become two to three hours.
  7. cruisertom

    cruisertom

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    368
    Location:
    sw michigan
    If I remember correctly you compress it still mounted and I just used a small allen wrench to keep it compressed then unbolt it. As far as the Tstat I have had them fail after a coolant flush, and other work assoc. with the coolant system. Sometimes they just fail and the bad thing is when they fail closed. Think of it as preventive maintenence.
  8. zetasig

    zetasig

    Messages:
    1,419
    Location:
    Hiding
    That is an oil compression type of tensioner and should return back up to its normal position in a few minutes once the tensioner tool is removed. I have the same tool and mine worked fine, after many broken bolts, a can of PB Blaster, and two days of soaking everything.

    Love road salt.
  9. SBFJ60FIG

    SBFJ60FIG

    Messages:
    1,015
    Location:
    Chicago!
    Yes, it does have fluid in it...thanks...the issue was complicated, but as simplified as I can get, the pin the pushes against the pulley bracket was rotated slightly. Thus, once compressed the pin would NOT go into it. I thought it was not compressed far enough, push a little harder and cracked the pulley.

    After installing the new pulley, I grabbed the pin with pliers, twisted it, and then compressed it and the pin would then lock it in place. I took detailed pictures of the little pin thing and will post them later to help any others who experience this issue. I compressed it 5 or 6 times and the pin would not lock it. Only after I broke it did I wise up and twist it.

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