16 inch, split rims or one piece?

Discussion in 'Diesel Tech and 24 volts Systems' started by Doug384, Jul 26, 2010.

  1. Doug384

    Doug384

    Messages:
    224
    Location:
    Picton, Ontario, Canada
    I have found a source of both types of rims. Anyone have any opinions that they care to share as to which they prefer or would choose? Yes, I am getting new tires.
  2. Non-split. You will likely have problems getting tires mounted on the splits. I have NEVER encountered a place that cannot deal with standard rims even in darkest Africa and in Central America.
  3. Doug384

    Doug384

    Messages:
    224
    Location:
    Picton, Ontario, Canada
    Thanks for that tip.

    What is the issue with the split? I thought that the tire could be pushed on with a standard iron? Doesn't that make trailside repairs easier? Granted some tire changers don't want to inflate them but then most truck tire dealers have cages for the split rims don't they?
  4. All true! Remember though that some tire shops won't do them and those that do WILL charge extra each time to mount tires so which do you want?

    I've spent time in Central America and I'm about to go to Africa with my 'Cruiser and I'm NOT interested in splits.
  5. blis

    blis

    Messages:
    722
    Location:
    in cold north
    split rims are also a potential deathtrap in case of inexperienced ppl working with them... so, i'd non-split all the way...
  6. Get one piece rims. Tires for split rims (tube type) are getting harder to find.

    ~John
  7. lostmarbles

    lostmarbles SILVER Star

    Messages:
    7,201
    Location:
    New Zealand
    I'm a geriatric weakling and I still manage to change my own tyres in my driveway. (And so far I've never killed myself once.)

    The danger-scare of splits is born out of ignorance.

    But if all your local tyre people are ignorant ... and you're not inclined to change tyres yourself .... don't choose splits.

    :cheers:

    There's no special requirement for tyres associated with splits! :frown:
  8. Neddy

    Neddy

    Messages:
    40
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    I think it's personal preference.

    I tend to like my junk to be just a little different than everyone else's, so maybe that's why I like splits.

    I have them on my 80.

    Just got new tires over the weekend. There are a few inconvienences related to them:

    It is true that not all shops will work on them. First two places I went said no, third said no problem.

    Those places that will install them are not likely to have them on hand. I ordered mine in the afternoon and they got them in the next morning. I doubt that you will be able to drive in and leave with new tires like you typically can with tubeless tires.

    There was a $25/tire surcharge to mount them. And it took almost 2 hours to complete.

    After all that though, they ride like butta smeared on velvet, so I couldn't be happier.
  9. bigbrowndog

    bigbrowndog

    Messages:
    1,642
    Location:
    N.Q. australia
    Have you ever repaired a puncture in the bush?
    Please tell me the problems you encountered doing a repair on a split rim.

    Some pluses are.
    No need to break the bead.
    You only need two decent screw drivers to remove the split rim.
    A hand pump/foot pump , small compressor is all that is needed to inflate the tire and seat the rim. If you inflate steadily and check the split rim there is very little chance of the rim coming adrift.
    Very easy, low energy repair in isolated places.
    Limits carrying extra wheels in isolated places.

    My Dislikes.
    With a puncture it instantly goes flat.
  10. Doug384

    Doug384

    Messages:
    224
    Location:
    Picton, Ontario, Canada
    "With a puncture it instantly goes flat."

    That is a really good point that I had almost forgotten. I remember having an instant flat on a loaded motorcycle at speed years ago. Luck had it that I did not end up in the oncoming traffic in a head on. Most of the tubeless tires of today seem to let go way slower.
  11. I've never run splits and in Central America there was a "pinchazo" or "llantera" all over the place ready to fix flats. If I had the unfortunate luck to blow both the main tire and the spare I carry plugs. I have not needed them but I have seen folks use them. In Africa the tire "shops" are less frequent but still around.

    Instant flat at speed would make it a deal breaker for me. Keeping a loaded 'Cruiser between the ditches, and out of on-coming traffic, when a tire goes flat instantly would make for an interesting time!!

  12. herbs

    herbs

    Messages:
    468
    Location:
    Queensland, Australia
    But then again I've yet to see an instant catastrophic sidewall failure with split rims, seen it plenty of times with tubeless tyres, especially Coopers. As long as the inside of the rim is kept pretty clean the split rims go real well. Older rims that have been neglected get rust on the inside, it dislodges and that's the cause of a lot of punctures.
  13. Go tubeless Buy yourself some decent tyre levers doug,plugs and some patches,you can usually plug most punctures on the car.
    A small tool for scuffing inside of tyre if you have to patch it.
    A beead breaker if you feel you need it.

    Hand levering a tubeless tyre off a rim is not such a big job,it is actually easier then say motocross bike tyres if youve ever done them.
  14. RufusTheDufus

    RufusTheDufus SILVER Star

    Messages:
    2,105
    Location:
    Maine
    I've done quite a few motocross tires over the years. That's why I've never attempted to do a tubeless car tire. I always thought they would be more difficult. The paddle tire I rad on my KX500 for the sand dunes was the hardest tire I've ever had to change.
  15. lostmarbles

    lostmarbles SILVER Star

    Messages:
    7,201
    Location:
    New Zealand
    I can see no reason why tubed tyres would be any more susceptible to "getting an instant flat" than tubeless.

    And splitrims themselves don't encourage "instant flats" IMO.

    In fact I've never ever had an "instant flat" occur on my BJ40. And yet I've always run splitrims (and consequently always run tubed tyres). But I have had about three or four "gradual flats" in that period.

    Any explanation of your reasoning/experience here Gazza?

    :beer:

    PS. With a motorcycle, you only have one wheel/tyre on the front so getting an "instant flat" there is ALWAYS going to be very scary (and can easily be lethal). So anyone that has experienced one will never forget it. ............... But such memoroes are no reason to blame tubed-tyres per se.

  16. I bet a paddle tyre is hard
    Much more sidewall on the 4x4 tyres hence more flex rufus.
  17. bigbrowndog

    bigbrowndog

    Messages:
    1,642
    Location:
    N.Q. australia
  18. bigbrowndog

    bigbrowndog

    Messages:
    1,642
    Location:
    N.Q. australia
    Cheers, I find them a lot harder to get back on the rim [talking toyota]. Also if you have to drive a short distance to be able to jack up the truck safely it can be really hard to get the tire to initially seal so it will pump up. You can actually repair a split while it is on the truck, bit hard with a tubeless.

  19. Youve never seen a tyre plugged while its still on the car?
  20. bigbrowndog

    bigbrowndog

    Messages:
    1,642
    Location:
    N.Q. australia
    Have you ever repaired a puncture in the bush?
    Please tell me the problems you encountered doing a repair on a split rim.

    Some pluses are.
    No need to break the bead.
    You only need two decent screw drivers to remove the split rim.
    A hand pump/foot pump , small compressor is all that is needed to inflate the tire and seat the rim. If you inflate steadily and check the split rim there is very little chance of the rim coming adrift.
    Very easy, low energy repair in isolated places.
    Limits carrying extra wheels in isolated places.

    My Dislikes.
    With a puncture it instantly goes flatLOL,

    Goldchaser wrote/
    Youve never seen a tyre plugged while its still on the car?

    Think you need to reread the post.

    Mate I am not talking about picking up a screw or nail in town. However I have never seen anyone remove a tubeless tire while the rim is on the car.

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